Solutions for Chapter 33: Automated Methods of Analysis

Principles of Instrumental Analysis | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780495012016 | Authors: Douglas A. Skoog F. James Holler Stanley R. Crouch

Full solutions for Principles of Instrumental Analysis | 6th Edition

ISBN: 9780495012016

Principles of Instrumental Analysis | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780495012016 | Authors: Douglas A. Skoog F. James Holler Stanley R. Crouch

Solutions for Chapter 33: Automated Methods of Analysis

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Principles of Instrumental Analysis , edition: 6. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Principles of Instrumental Analysis was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495012016. Since 9 problems in chapter 33: Automated Methods of Analysis have been answered, more than 3643 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 33: Automated Methods of Analysis includes 9 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • activation energy (Ea).

    The minimum amount of energy required to initiate a chemical reaction. (13.4)

  • alpha (a) helix

    For proteins, a feature of secondary structure that forms when a portion of the protein twists into a spiral.

  • b-Elimination

    A reaction in which a molecule, such as HCl, HBr, HI, or HOH, is split out or eliminated from adjacent carbons

  • Bredt’s rule

    A rule that states that it is not possible for a bridgehead carbon of a bicyclic system to possess a carbon carbon double bond if it involves a trans p bond being incorporated in a ring comprised of fewer than eight atoms.

  • chain-growth polymer

    A polymer that is formed under conditions in which the monomers do not react directly with each other, but rather, each monomer is added to the growing chain, one at a time.

  • common-ion effect

    A shift of an equilibrium induced by an ion common to the equilibrium. For example, added Na2SO4 decreases the solubility of the slightly soluble salt BaSO4, or added NaF decreases the percent ionization of HF. (Section 17.1)

  • condensation polymerization

    Polymerization in which molecules are joined together through condensation reactions. (Section 12.8)

  • condensation.

    The phenomenon of going from the gaseous state to the liquid state. (11.8)

  • Conformation

    Any three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a molecule that results from rotation about a single bond.

  • Dehydrohalogenation

    Removal of !H and !X from adjacent carbons; a type of b-elimination

  • Glycol

    A compound with hydroxyl (!OH) groups on adjacent carbons.

  • Hydroboration-oxidation

    A method for converting an alkene to an alcohol. The alkene is treated with borane (BH3) to give a trialkylborane, which is then oxidized with alkaline hydrogen peroxide to give an alcohol

  • hydrophobic

    Water repelling. The term is often used to describe a type of colloid. (Section 13.6)

  • Lewis structure

    A representation of covalent bonding in a molecule that is drawn using Lewis symbols. Shared electron pairs are shown as lines, and unshared electron pairs are shown as pairs of dots. Only the valence-shell electrons are shown. (Section 8.3)

  • meta

    On an aromatic ring, the C3 position.

  • nitrosonium ion

    The NO+ ion, which is formed when NaNO2 is treated with HCl.

  • optical isomerism

    A form of isomerism in which the two forms of a compound (stereoisomers) are nonsuperimposable mirror images. (Section 23.4)

  • resonance structures (resonance forms)

    Individual Lewis structures in cases where two or more Lewis structures are equally good descriptions of a single molecule. The resonance structures in such an instance are “averaged” to give a more accurate description of the real molecule. (Section 8.6)

  • ribonucleic acid (RNA)

    A polynucleotide in which ribose is the sugar component. (Section 24.10)

  • Wohl degradation

    A process that involves the removal of a carbon atom from an aldose. The aldehyde group is first converted to a cyanohydrin, followed by loss of HCN in the presence of a base.

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