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Solutions for Chapter 1.9: Sulfur and Phosphorus-Containing Organic Compounds and the Octet Rule

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 1.9: Sulfur and Phosphorus-Containing Organic Compounds and the Octet Rule

Solutions for Chapter 1.9
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This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Organic Chemistry, was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741. Chapter 1.9: Sulfur and Phosphorus-Containing Organic Compounds and the Octet Rule includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 1 problems in chapter 1.9: Sulfur and Phosphorus-Containing Organic Compounds and the Octet Rule have been answered, more than 33688 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • activity series.

    A summary of the results of many possible displacement reactions. (4.4)

  • alkali metals.

    The Group 1A elements (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Fr). (2.4)

  • amide

    An organic compound that has an NR2 group attached to a carbonyl. (Section 24.4)

  • amorphous solid.

    A solid that lacks a regular three-dimensional arrangement of atoms or molecules. (11.7)

  • Bimolecular reaction

    A reaction in which two species are involved in the rate-determining step.

  • calcination

    The heating of an ore to bring about its decomposition and the elimination of a volatile product. For example, a carbonate ore might be calcined to drive off CO2. (Section 23.2)

  • cell voltage.

    Difference in electrical potential between the anode and the cathode of a galvanic cell. (18.2)

  • delocalized molecular orbitals.

    Molecular orbitals that are not confined between two adjacent bonding atoms but actually extend over three or more atoms. (10.8)

  • density.

    The mass of a substance divided by its volume. (1.6)

  • displacement reaction

    A reaction in which an element reacts with a compound, displacing an element from it. (Section 4.4)

  • electrophilic aromatic substitution

    A substitution reaction in which an aromatic proton is replaced by an electrophile and the aromatic moiety is preserved.

  • high-resolution mass spectrometry

    A technique that involves the use of a detector that can measure the m/z values to four decimal places.This technique allows for the determination of the molecular formula of an unknown compound.

  • law of definite proportions

    A law that states that the elemental composition of a pure substance is always the same, regardless of its source; also called the law of constant composition. (Section 1.2)

  • Phasing

    The sign of the wave function at particular coordinates in space, either plus or minus. Phasing is often represented by colors, such as red or blue

  • photochemical smog

    A complex mixture of undesirable substances produced by the action of sunlight on an urban atmosphere polluted with automobile emissions. The major starting ingredients are nitrogen oxides and organic substances, notably olefins and aldehydes. (Section 18.2)

  • Photons

    An alternative way to describe electromagnetic radiation as a stream of particles

  • polydentate ligand

    A ligand in which two or more donor atoms can coordinate to the same metal ion. (Section 23.3)

  • Polysaccharide

    A carbohydrate containing a large number of monosaccharide units, each joined to the next by one or more glycosidic bonds.

  • potential energy

    The energy that an object possesses as a result of its composition or its position with respect to another object. (Section 5.1)

  • rearrangement

    One of the four arrow-pushing patterns for ionic reactions.

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