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Solutions for Chapter 2.20: Physical Properties of Alkanes and Cycloalkanes

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 2.20: Physical Properties of Alkanes and Cycloalkanes

Solutions for Chapter 2.20
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This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Since 1 problems in chapter 2.20: Physical Properties of Alkanes and Cycloalkanes have been answered, more than 37349 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Organic Chemistry, was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741. Chapter 2.20: Physical Properties of Alkanes and Cycloalkanes includes 1 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • band structure

    The electronic structure of a solid, defining the allowed ranges of energy for electrons in a solid. (Section 12.7)

  • buffer solution.

    A solution of (a) a weak acid or base and (b) its salt; both components must be present. The solution has the ability to resist changes in pH upon the addition of small amounts of either acid or base. (16.3)

  • conjugate base

    In an acid-base reaction, the product that results when an acid is deprotonated.

  • d sugar

    A carbohydrate for whichthe chirality center farthest from the carbonylgroup will have an OH group pointing to theright in the Fischer projection.

  • diol

    A compound containing two hydroxyl groups (OH).

  • electron-domain geometry

    The three- dimensional arrangement of the electron domains around an atom according to the VSEPR model. (Section 9.2)

  • exo

    In Diels-Alder reactions that produce bicyclic structures, the positions that are anti to the larger bridge.

  • Hydrogen bonding

    The attractive interaction between a hydrogen atom bonded to an atom of high electronegativity (most commonly O or N) and a lone pair of electrons on another atom of high electronegativity (again, most commonly O or N).

  • hydroxyl group

    An OH group.

  • intermetallic compound

    A homogeneous alloy with definite properties and a fixed composition. Intermetallic compounds are stoichiometric compounds that form between metallic elements. (Section 12.3)

  • Markovnikov addition

    In additionreactions, the observation that the hydrogen atomis generally placed at the vinylic position alreadybearing the larger number of hydrogen atoms.

  • metallic bond

    Bonding, usually in solid metals, in which the bonding electrons are relatively free to move throughout the three-dimensional structure. (Section 8.1)

  • N terminus

    For a peptide chain,the end that contains the amino group.

  • photoionization

    The removal of an electron from an atom or molecule by absorption of light. (Section 18.2)

  • radical anion

    An intermediate that has both a negative charge and an unpaired electron.

  • single bond

    A covalent bond involving one electron pair. (Section 8.3)

  • SN1

    A unimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction.

  • Specifi c rotation

    The observed rotation of the plane of polarized light when a sample is placed in a tube 1.0 dm in length and at a concentration of 1 g/mL for a solution. For a pure liquid, concentration is expressed in g/mL (density).

  • spin-pairing energy

    The energy required to pair an electron with another electron occupying an orbital. (Section 23.6)

  • Thermodynamic control

    Experimental conditions that permit the establishment of equilibrium between two or more products of a reaction. The composition of the product mixture is determined by the relative stabilities of the products.