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Solutions for Chapter 3.10: Conformational Analysis of Monosubstituted Cyclohexanes

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 3.10: Conformational Analysis of Monosubstituted Cyclohexanes

Solutions for Chapter 3.10
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Chapter 3.10: Conformational Analysis of Monosubstituted Cyclohexanes includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 2 problems in chapter 3.10: Conformational Analysis of Monosubstituted Cyclohexanes have been answered, more than 27853 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Organic Chemistry, was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • activity

    The decay rate of a radioactive material, generally expressed as the number of disintegrations per unit time. (Section 21.4)

  • Anti stereoselectivity

    The addition of atoms or groups of atoms to opposite faces of a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • Benzyl group (C6H5CH2!)

    The group derived from toluene by removing a hydrogen from its methyl group.

  • Benzyne intermediate

    A reactive intermediate formed by b-elimination from adjacent carbon atoms of a benzene ring and having a triple bond in the benzene ring. The second p bond of the benzyne triple bond is formed by the weak overlap of coplanar 2p orbitals on adjacent carbons.

  • beta particles.

    See beta rays.

  • cellular respiration

    A process by which molecular oxygen is used to convert food into CO2, water, and energy.

  • Conjugate addition

    Addition of a nucleophile to the b-carbon of an a,b-unsaturated carbonyl compound. (Section 20.2A) Addition to carbons 1 and 4 of a conjugated diene.

  • critical pressure (Pc).

    The minimum pressure necessary to bring about liquefaction at the critical temperature. (11.8)

  • elastomer

    A material that can undergo a substantial change in shape via stretching, bending, or compression and return to its original shape upon release of the distorting force. (Section 12.6)

  • Enol

    A compound containing a hydroxyl group bonded to a doubly bonded carbon atom.

  • Exergonic reaction

    A reaction in which the Gibbs free energy of the products is lower than that of the reactants. The position of equilibrium for an exergonic reaction favors products.

  • fatty acids

    Long-chain carboxylic acids.

  • Friedel-Crafts reaction

    An electrophilic aromatic substitution in which a hydrogen of an aromatic ring is replaced by an alkyl or acyl group.

  • lithium dialkyl cuprate

    A nucleophilic compound with the general structureR2CuLi.

  • loss of a leaving group

    One of the four arrow-pushing patterns for ionic reactions.

  • Molecular dipole moment (m)

    The vector sum of individual bond dipoles.

  • rate constant

    A constant of proportionality between the reaction rate and the concentrations of reactants that appear in the rate law. (Section 14.3)

  • replacement test

    A test for determining the relationship between two protons. The compound is drawn two times, each time replacing one of the protons with deuterium. If the two compounds are identical, the protons are homotopic. If the two compounds are enantiomers, the protons are enantiotopic. If the two compounds are diastereomers, the protons are diastereotopic.

  • standard atomic weight

    The weighted averages for each element, which takes into account isotopic abundance.

  • Williamson ether synthesis

    A general method for the synthesis of dialkyl ethers by an SN2 reaction between a haloalkane and an alkoxide ion.

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