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Solutions for Chapter 5.3: Isomerism in Alkenes

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 5.3: Isomerism in Alkenes

Solutions for Chapter 5.3
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This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Since 2 problems in chapter 5.3: Isomerism in Alkenes have been answered, more than 22785 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Organic Chemistry, was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 5.3: Isomerism in Alkenes includes 2 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition reaction

    A reaction in which two atoms or groups of atoms react with a double bond, forming a compound with the two new groups bonded to the carbons of the original double bond.

  • allotropes.

    Two or more forms of the same element that differ significantly in chemical and physical properties. (2.6)

  • anti-coplanar

    A conformation in which a hydrogen atom and a leaving group are separated by a dihedral angle of exactly 180°.

  • Aramid

    A polyaromatic amide; a polymer in which the monomer units are an aromatic diamine and an aromatic dicarboxylic acid

  • benzyne

    A high-energy intermediate formed during the elimination-addition reaction that occurs between chlorobenzene and either NaOH (at high temperature) or NaNH2.

  • cation

    A positively charged ion. (Section 2.7)

  • Center of symmetry

    A point so situated that identical components of an object are located on opposite sides and equidistant from that point along any axis passing through it.

  • ferrimagnetism

    A form of magnetism in which unpaired electron spins on different-type ions point in opposite directions but do not fully cancel out. (Section 23.1)

  • Monomer

    From the Greek, mono 1 meros, meaning single part. The simplest nonredundant unit from which a polymer is synthesized.

  • Organic synthesis

    A series of reactions by which a set of organic starting materials is converted to a more complicated structure.

  • percent yield

    The ratio of the actual (experimental) yield of a product to its theoretical (calculated) yield, multiplied by 100. (Section 3.7)

  • Primary structure of nucleic acids

    The sequence of bases along the pentose-phosphodiester backbone of a DNA or RNA molecule read from the 5’ end to the 3’ end

  • prostaglandins

    Lipids that contain 20 carbon atoms and are characterized by a five-membered ring with two side chains.

  • racemic mixture

    A mixture of equal amounts of the dextrorotatory and levorotatory forms of a chiral molecule. A racemic mixture will not rotate the plane of polarized light. (Section 23.4)

  • reducing agent, or reductant

    The substance that is oxidized and thereby causes the reduction of some other substance in an oxidation–reduction reaction. (Section 20.1)

  • regioselective

    A reaction that can produce two or more constitutional isomers but nevertheless produces one as the major product.

  • Resonance in NMR spectroscopy

    The absorption of electromagnetic radiation by a precessing nucleus and the resulting “fl ip” of its nuclear spin from the lower energy state to the higher energy state.

  • saturated

    A compound that contains no p bonds.

  • Step-growth polymerization

    A polymerization in which chain growth occurs in a stepwise manner between difunctional monomers as, for example, between adipic acid and hexamethylenediamine to form nylon 66. Also called condensation polymerization.

  • Zaitsev’s rule

    A rule stating that the major product of a b-elimination reaction is the most stable alkene; that is, it is the alkene with the greatest number of substituents on the carboncarbon double bond

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