Solutions for Chapter 6.2: Stereochemistry of Alkene Hydrogenation

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 6.2: Stereochemistry of Alkene Hydrogenation

Solutions for Chapter 6.2
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Organic Chemistry, was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741. Chapter 6.2: Stereochemistry of Alkene Hydrogenation includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Since 1 problems in chapter 6.2: Stereochemistry of Alkene Hydrogenation have been answered, more than 10955 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • bond order.

    The difference between the numbers of electrons in bonding molecular orbitals and antibonding molecular orbitals, divided by two. (10.7)

  • broadband decoupling

    In 13C NMR spectroscopy, a technique in which all 13C!1H splitting is suppressed with the use of two rf transmitters.

  • carbonyl group

    A CRO bond. carboxylic acid derivative (Sect. 21.6): A compound that is similar in structure to a carboxylic acid (RCOOH) but the OH group of the carboxylic acid has been replaced with a different group, Z, where Z is a heteroatom such as Cl, O, N, etc. Nitriles (R!C#N) are also considered to be carboxylic acid derivatives because they have the same oxidation state as carboxylic acids.

  • conjugate base

    In an acid-base reaction, the product that results when an acid is deprotonated.

  • Dipeptide

    A molecule containing two amino acid units joined by a peptide bond

  • Dipole-dipole interaction

    The attraction between the positive end of one dipole and the negative end of another.

  • doublet

    In NMR spectroscopy, a signal that is comprised of two peaks.

  • E1cb mechanism

    An eliminationreaction in which the leaving group only leavesafter deprotonation occurs. This process occurs atthe end of an aldol condensation.

  • fibers

    Strands of a polymer that are generated when the polymer is heated, forced through small holes, and then cooled.

  • Hyperconjugation

    Interaction of electrons in a s-bonding orbital with the vacant 2p orbital of an adjacent positively charged carbon.

  • lone pair

    A pair of unshared, or nonbonding, electrons.

  • molarity

    The concentration of a solution expressed as moles of solute per liter of solution; abbreviated M. (Section 4.5)

  • nonaromatic

    A compound that lacks a ring with a continuous system of overlapping p orbitals.

  • parts per billion (ppb)

    The concentration of a solution in grams of solute per 109 (billion) grams of solution; equals micrograms of solute per liter of solution for aqueous solutions. (Section 13.4)

  • pi (p) bond

    A bond formed from adjacent, overlapping p orbitals.

  • Polarizability

    A measure of the ease of distortion of the distribution of electron density about an atom or group in response to interaction with other molecules or ions. Fluorine which has a high electronegativity and holds its electrons tightly, has a very low polarizability. Iodine, which has a lower electronegativity and holds its electrons less tightly, has a very high polarizability.

  • polyurethanes

    Polymers made up of repeating urethane groups, also sometimes called carbamate groups (!N!CO2!).

  • reducing agent, or reductant

    The substance that is oxidized and thereby causes the reduction of some other substance in an oxidation–reduction reaction. (Section 20.1)

  • spontaneous process

    A process that is capable of proceeding in a given direction, as written or described, without needing to be driven by an outside source of energy. A process may be spontaneous even though it is very slow. (Section 19.1)

  • vicinal

    A term used to describe two identical groups attached to adjacent carbon atoms.

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