Solutions for Chapter 7.15: Resolution of Enantiomers

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 7.15: Resolution of Enantiomers

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Organic Chemistry, was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741. Since 3 problems in chapter 7.15: Resolution of Enantiomers have been answered, more than 10803 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 7.15: Resolution of Enantiomers includes 3 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acid.

    A substance that yields hydrogen ions (H1) when dissolved in water. (2.7)

  • actual yield.

    The amount of product actually obtained in a reaction. (3.10)

  • boiling point.

    The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the external atmospheric pressure. (11.8)

  • bonding atomic radius

    The radius of an atom as defined by the distances separating it from other atoms to which it is chemically bonded. (Section 7.3)

  • continuous-wave (CW) spectrometer

    An NMR spectrometer that holds the magnetic field constant and slowly sweeps through a range of rf frequencies, monitoring which frequencies are absorbed.

  • crystal lattice

    An imaginary network of points on which the repeating motif of a solid may be imagined to be laid down so that the structure of the crystal is obtained. The motif may be a single atom or a group of atoms. Each lattice point represents an identical environment in the crystal. (Section 12.2)

  • degenerate

    A situation in which two or more orbitals have the same energy. (Section 6.7)

  • equilibrium-constant expression

    The expression that describes the relationship among the concentrations (or partial pressures) of the substances present in a system at equilibrium. The numerator is obtained by multiplying the concentrations of the substances on the product side of the equation, each raised to a power equal to its coefficient in the chemical equation. The denominator similarly contains the concentrations of the substances on the reactant side of the equation. (Section 15.2)

  • glucose

    A polyhydroxy aldehyde whose formula is CH2OH1CHOH24CHO; it is the most important of the monosaccharides. (Section 24.8)

  • Lactone

    A cyclic ester.

  • linkage isomers

    Structural isomers of coordination compounds in which a ligand differs in its mode of attachment to a metal ion. (Section 23.4)

  • micelle

    A group of molecules arranged in a sphere such that the surface of the sphere is comprised of polar groups, rendering the micelle water soluble.

  • Molecular ion (M1)

    The radical cation formed by removal of a single electron from a parent molecule in a mass spectrometer.

  • node

    Points in an atom at which the electron density is zero. For example, the node in a 2s orbital is a spherical surface. (Section 6.6)

  • Plane-polarized light

    Light oscillating in only parallel planes.

  • Restriction endonuclease

    An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a particular phosphodiester bond within a DNA strand.

  • smectic liquid crystalline phase

    A liquid crystal in which the molecules are aligned along their long axes and arranged in sheets, with the ends of the molecules aligned. There are several different kinds of smectic phases. (Section 12.8)

  • SN1

    A unimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction.

  • termination

    In radical reactions, a step in which two radicals are joined to give a compound with no unshared electrons.

  • zwitterion

    A net neutral compound that exhibits charge separation. Amino acids exist as zwitterions at physiological pH.

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