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Solutions for Chapter 11.6: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402741

Organic Chemistry, | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402741 | Authors: Francis A Carey Dr., Robert M. Giuliano

Solutions for Chapter 11.6: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

Solutions for Chapter 11.6
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Organic Chemistry, was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402741. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, , edition: 9. Chapter 11.6: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 2 problems in chapter 11.6: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons have been answered, more than 25689 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • angle strain

    The increase in energy associated with a bond angle that has deviated from the preferred angle of 109.5°.

  • becquerel

    The SI unit of radioactivity. It corresponds to one nuclear disintegration per second. (Section 21.4)

  • Conjugate base

    The species formed when an acid transfers a proton to a base

  • conversion factor

    A ratio relating the same quantity in two systems of units that is used to convert the units of measurement. (Section 1.6)

  • electrocyclic reaction

    A pericyclic process in which a conjugated polyene undergoes cyclization. In the process, one p bond is converted into a s bond, while the remaining p bonds all change their location. The newly formed s bond joins the ends of the original p system,thereby creating a ring.

  • electron capture

    A mode of radioactive decay in which an inner-shell orbital electron is captured by the nucleus. (Section 21.1)

  • Enantiotopic groups

    Atoms or groups on an atom that give a chiral center when one of the groups is replaced by another group. A pair of enantiomers results. The hydrogens of the CH2 group of ethanol, for example, are enantiotopic. Replacing one of them by deuterium gives (R)-1-deuteroethanol; replacing the other gives (S)-1-deuteroethanol. Enantiotopic groups have identical chemical shifts in achiral environments but different chemical shifts in chiral environments.

  • fossil fuels

    Coal, oil, and natural gas, which are presently our major sources of energy. (Section 5.8)

  • furanose

    A five-membered cyclic hemiacetal form of a carbohydrate.

  • Isomers

    Different compounds with the same molecular formula.

  • linkage isomers

    Structural isomers of coordination compounds in which a ligand differs in its mode of attachment to a metal ion. (Section 23.4)

  • mixture

    A combination of two or more substances in which each substance retains its own chemical identity. (Section 1.2)

  • partially condensed structures

    A drawing style in which the CH bonds are not drawn explicitly, but all other bonds are drawn.

  • Protic solvent

    A solvent that is a hydrogen-bond donor. Common protic solvents are water, low-molecular-weight alcohols, and low-molecular weight carboxylic acids.

  • radioisotope

    An isotope that is radioactive; that is, it is undergoing nuclear changes with emission of radiation. (Section 21.1)

  • Retrosynthesis

    A process of reasoning backwards from a target molecule to a suitable set of starting materials.

  • Secondary structure of proteins

    The ordered arrangements (conformations) of amino acids in localized regions of a polypeptide or protein

  • soluble

    A term used to indicate that a certain volume of a compound will dissolve in a specified amount of a liquid at room temperature.

  • steroids

    Lipids that are based on a tetracyclic ring system involving three six-membered rings and one five-membered ring. Cholesterol is an example.

  • tetravalent

    An element, such as carbon, that forms four bonds.

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