Solutions for Chapter 3: The Second Law

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Full solutions for Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780716787594

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Solutions for Chapter 3: The Second Law

Solutions for Chapter 3
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Textbook: Physical Chemistry
Edition: 8
Author: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula
ISBN: 9780716787594

Chapter 3: The Second Law includes 89 full step-by-step solutions. Since 89 problems in chapter 3: The Second Law have been answered, more than 21963 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Physical Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716787594. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Physical Chemistry , edition: 8. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • addition polymerization

    Polymerization that occurs through coupling of monomers with one another, with no other products formed in the reaction. (Section 12.8)

  • adsorption

    The binding of molecules to a surface. (Section 14.7)

  • alcohol

    A compound that possesses a hydroxyl group (OH).

  • alkynide ion

    The conjugate base of a terminal alkyne.

  • amalgam.

    An alloy of mercury with another metal or metals. (21.2)

  • blocking group

    A group that can be readily installed and uninstalled. Used for regiochemical control during synthesis.

  • carbonyl group

    A CRO bond. carboxylic acid derivative (Sect. 21.6): A compound that is similar in structure to a carboxylic acid (RCOOH) but the OH group of the carboxylic acid has been replaced with a different group, Z, where Z is a heteroatom such as Cl, O, N, etc. Nitriles (R!C#N) are also considered to be carboxylic acid derivatives because they have the same oxidation state as carboxylic acids.

  • disrotatory

    In electrocyclicreactions, a type of rotation in which the orbitalsbeing used to form the new s bond must rotate in opposite directions (one rotates clockwise while the other rotates counterclockwise).

  • divalent

    An element that forms two bonds, such as oxygen.

  • entropy

    A thermodynamic function associated with the number of different equivalent energy states or spatial arrangements in which a system may be found. It is a thermodynamic state function, which means that once we specify the conditions for a system—that is, the temperature, pressure, and so on—the entropy is defined. (Section 19.2)

  • matter waves

    The term used to describe the wave characteristics of a moving particle. (Section 6.4)

  • Newman projection

    A drawing style that is designed to show the conformation of a molecule.

  • nonelectrolyte

    A substance that does not ionize in water and consequently gives a nonconducting solution. (Section 4.1)

  • optically inactive

    A compound that does not rotate plane-polarized light.

  • oxyanion

    A polyatomic anion that contains one or more oxygen atoms. (Section 2.8)

  • photoionization

    The removal of an electron from an atom or molecule by absorption of light. (Section 18.2)

  • Polarizability

    A measure of the ease of distortion of the distribution of electron density about an atom or group in response to interaction with other molecules or ions. Fluorine which has a high electronegativity and holds its electrons tightly, has a very low polarizability. Iodine, which has a lower electronegativity and holds its electrons less tightly, has a very high polarizability.

  • Polysaccharide

    A carbohydrate containing a large number of monosaccharide units, each joined to the next by one or more glycosidic bonds.

  • racemic mixture

    A mixture of equal amounts of the dextrorotatory and levorotatory forms of a chiral molecule. A racemic mixture will not rotate the plane of polarized light. (Section 23.4)

  • Resonance

    A theory that many molecules and ions are best described as a hybrid of several Lewis structures

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