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Solutions for Chapter 7: Chemical equilibrium

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Full solutions for Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780716787594

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Solutions for Chapter 7: Chemical equilibrium

Solutions for Chapter 7
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Textbook: Physical Chemistry
Edition: 8
Author: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula
ISBN: 9780716787594

Chapter 7: Chemical equilibrium includes 72 full step-by-step solutions. Physical Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716787594. Since 72 problems in chapter 7: Chemical equilibrium have been answered, more than 37057 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Physical Chemistry , edition: 8.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • accuracy

    A measure of how closely individual measurements agree with the correct value. (Section 1.5)

  • acidic oxide (acidic anhydride)

    An oxide that either reacts with a base to form a salt or with water to form an acid. (Section 22.5)

  • acylium ion

    The resonancestabilized, cationic intermediate of a Friedel-Crafts acylation, formed by treating an acyl halide with aluminum trichloride.

  • amalgam.

    An alloy of mercury with another metal or metals. (21.2)

  • divalent

    An element that forms two bonds, such as oxygen.

  • electron configuration

    The arrangement of electrons in the orbitals of an atom or molecule (Section 6.8)

  • functional group

    A characteristic group of atoms/bonds that possess a predictable chemical behavior.

  • Ground-state electron confi guration

    The lowest-energy electron confi guration for an atom or molecule.

  • Hammond postulate

    In an exothermic process the transition state is closer in energy to the reactants than to the products, and therefore the structure of the transition state more closely resembles the reactants. In contrast, the transition state in an endothermic process is closer in energy to the products, and therefore the transition state more closely resembles the products.

  • homogeneous equilibrium

    The equilibrium established between reactant and product substances that are all in the same phase. (Section 15.4)

  • insulators

    Materials that do not conduct electricity. (Section 12.7)

  • line spectrum

    A spectrum that contains radiation at only certain specific wavelengths. (Section 6.3)

  • malonic ester synthesis

    Asynthetic technique that enables the transformationof a halide into a carboxylic acid with theintroduction of two new carbon atoms.

  • mineral

    A solid, inorganic substance occurring in nature, such as calcium carbonate, which occurs as calcite. (Section 23.1)

  • molecular orbital (MO)

    An allowed state for an electron in a molecule. According to molecular-orbital theory, a molecular orbital is entirely analogous to an atomic orbital, which is an allowed state for an electron in an atom. Most bonding molecular orbitals can be classified as s or p, depending on the disposition of electron density with respect to the internuclear axis. (Section 9.7)

  • nonionizing radiation

    Radiation that does not have sufficient energy to remove an electron from a molecule. (Section 21.9)

  • Organometallic compound

    A compound that contains a carbon-metal bond.

  • periodic table

    The arrangement of elements in order of increasing atomic number, with elements having similar properties placed in vertical columns. (Section 2.5)

  • polyvinyl chloride, (PVC)

    A polymer formed from the polymerization of vinyl chloride (H2CRCHCl).

  • thermodynamic control

    A reaction for which the ratio of products is determined solely by the distribution of energy among the products.

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