Solutions for Chapter 15: Molecular spectroscopy 3: magnetic resonance

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Full solutions for Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780716787594

Physical Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780716787594 | Authors: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula

Solutions for Chapter 15: Molecular spectroscopy 3: magnetic resonance

Solutions for Chapter 15
4 5 0 280 Reviews
24
4
Textbook: Physical Chemistry
Edition: 8
Author: Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula
ISBN: 9780716787594

Physical Chemistry was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716787594. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Physical Chemistry , edition: 8. Since 73 problems in chapter 15: Molecular spectroscopy 3: magnetic resonance have been answered, more than 18822 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 15: Molecular spectroscopy 3: magnetic resonance includes 73 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • activated complex.

    The species temporarily formed by the reactant molecules as a result of the collision before they form the product. (13.4)

  • Alkaloid

    A basic nitrogen-containing compound of plant origin, many of which are physiologically active when administered to humans.

  • alkane

    A hydrocarbon that lacks p bonds.

  • Antiaromatic compound

    A monocyclic compound that is planar or nearly so, has one 2p orbital on each atom of the ring, and has 4n p electrons in the cyclic arrangement of overlapping 2p orbitals, where n is an integer. Antiaromatic compounds are especially unstable

  • Chlorofl uorocarbons (CFCs, Freons)

    Compounds with one or two carbons, chlorine, and fl uorine, formerly used as refrigerants

  • Claisen condensation

    A nucleophilic acyl substitution reaction in which the nucleophile is an ester enolate and the electrophile is an ester.

  • collision model

    A model of reaction rates based on the idea that molecules must collide to react; it explains the factors influencing reaction rates in terms of the frequency of collisions, the number of collisions with energies exceeding the activation energy, and the probability that the collisions occur with suitable orientations. (Section 14.5)

  • complex ion.

    An ion containing a central metal cation bonded to one or more molecules or ions. (16.10)

  • covalent compounds.

    Compounds containing only covalent bonds. (9.4)

  • Energy

    The ability to do work.

  • Formal charge

    The charge on an atom in a polyatomic ion or molecule

  • Homolytic bond cleavage

    Cleavage of a bond so that each fragment retains one electron; formation of radicals.

  • ionization energy

    The energy required to remove an electron from a gaseous atom when the atom is in its ground state. (Section 7.4)

  • Lewis dot structure

    The symbol of an element surrounded by a number of dots equal to the number of electrons in the valence shell of the atom

  • ligand

    An ion or molecule that coordinates to a metal atom or to a metal ion to form a complex. (Section 23.2)

  • Living polymer

    A polymer chain that continues to grow without chain-termination steps until either all of the monomer is consumed or some external agent is added to terminate the chain. The polymer chains will continue to grow if more monomer is added.

  • off-resonance decoupling

    In NMR spectroscopy, a technique in which only the one-bond couplings are observed. CH3 groups appear as quartets, CH2 groups appear as triplets, CH groups appear as doublets, and quaternary carbon atoms appear as singlets.

  • pascal (Pa)

    The SI unit of pressure: 1 Pa = 1 N >m2 . (Section 10.2)

  • Polycarbonate

    A polyester in which the carboxyl groups are derived from carbonic acid

  • Stereoisomers

    Isomers that have the same molecular formula and the same connectivity of their atoms but a different orientation of their atoms in space

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Physical Chemistry

Forgot password? Reset password here

Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Physical Chemistry
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Thousands of Study Materials at Your School

Forgot password? Reset password here

Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Thousands of Study Materials at Your School
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here