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Solutions for Chapter 9: MOLECULAR GEOMETRY AND BONDING THEORIES

Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780136006176 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780136006176

Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780136006176 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward

Solutions for Chapter 9: MOLECULAR GEOMETRY AND BONDING THEORIES

Solutions for Chapter 9
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 11
Author: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780136006176

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science , edition: 11. Chapter 9: MOLECULAR GEOMETRY AND BONDING THEORIES includes 96 full step-by-step solutions. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780136006176. Since 96 problems in chapter 9: MOLECULAR GEOMETRY AND BONDING THEORIES have been answered, more than 100223 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aldonic acid

    The product obtained when the aldehyde group of an aldose is oxidized.

  • alkaline earth metals.

    The Group 2A elements (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra). (2.4)

  • Alkylation reaction

    Any reaction in which a new carbon-carbon bond to an alkyl group is formed.

  • allylic carbocation

    A carbocation in which the positive charge is adjacent to a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • catalyst.

    A substance that increases the rate of a chemical reaction without itself being consumed. (13.6)

  • coordination number

    The number of adjacent atoms to which an atom is directly bonded. In a complex the coordination number of the metal ion is the number of donor atoms to which it is bonded. (Sections 12.37 and 24.2)

  • critical pressure (Pc).

    The minimum pressure necessary to bring about liquefaction at the critical temperature. (11.8)

  • Enantiomers

    Stereoisomers that are nonsuperposable mirror images of each other; refers to a relationship between pairs of objects

  • Hund’s rule

    When considering electrons in atomic orbitals, a rule that states that one electron is placed in each degenerate orbital first, before electrons are paired up.

  • hyperconjugation

    An effect that explains why alkyl groups stabilize a carbocation.

  • kinetic energy

    The energy that an object possesses by virtue of its motion. (Section 5.1)

  • l sugar

    A carbohydrate for which the chirality center farthest from the carbonyl group will have an OH group pointing to the left in the Fischer projection.

  • Lipid

    A biomolecule isolated from plant or animal sources by extraction with nonpolar organic solvents, such as diethyl ether and hexane.

  • Melt transition (Tm)

    The temperature at which crystalline regions of a polymer melt.

  • Reactive intermediate

    A high-energy species formed between two successive reaction steps, that lies in an energy minimum between the two transition states

  • Resonance

    A theory that many molecules and ions are best described as a hybrid of several Lewis structures

  • Resonance hybrid

    A molecule, ion, or radical described as a composite of a number of contributing structures

  • saturated hydrocarbon

    A hydrocarbon that contains no p bonds.

  • SN1

    A unimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction.

  • step-growth polymers

    Polymers that are formed under conditions in which the individual monomers react with each other to form oligomers, which are then joined together to form polymers.