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Solutions for Chapter 24: CHEMISTRY OF COORDINATION COMPOUNDS

Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780136006176 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780136006176

Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780136006176 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward

Solutions for Chapter 24: CHEMISTRY OF COORDINATION COMPOUNDS

Solutions for Chapter 24
4 5 0 361 Reviews
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 11
Author: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780136006176

Since 74 problems in chapter 24: CHEMISTRY OF COORDINATION COMPOUNDS have been answered, more than 23812 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science , edition: 11. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780136006176. Chapter 24: CHEMISTRY OF COORDINATION COMPOUNDS includes 74 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alcohol

    An organic compound obtained by substituting a hydroxyl group 1¬OH2 for a hydrogen on a hydrocarbon. (Sections 2.9 and 24.4)

  • Antibonding molecular orbital

    A molecular orbital in which electrons have a higher energy than they would in isolated atomic orbitals

  • auxochrome

    When applying Woodward-Fieser rules, the groups attached to the chromophore.

  • Avogadro’s law.

    At constant pressure and temperature, the volume of a gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of the gas present. (5.3)

  • bending

    In IR spectroscopy, a type of vibration that generally produces a signal in the fingerprint region of an IR spectrum.

  • carbohydrates

    Polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones with molecular formula CxH2xOx.

  • dipole moment

    A measure of the separation and magnitude of the positive and negative charges in polar molecules. (Section 8.4)

  • electron density

    The probability of finding an electron at any particular point in an atom; this probability is equal to c2, the square of the wave function. Also called the probability density. (Section 6.5)

  • Fourier-transform NMR (FT-NMR)

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a technique in which the sample is irradiated with a short pulse that covers the entire range of relevant rf frequencies.

  • intermediate

    A structure corresponding to a local minimum (valley) in an energy diagram.

  • inversion of configuration

    During a reaction, when the configuration of a chirality center is changed.

  • law of constant composition

    A law that states that the elemental composition of a pure compound is always the same, regardless of its source; also called the law of definite proportions. (Section 1.2)

  • oxyacid

    A compound in which one or more OH groups, and possibly additional oxygen atoms, are bonded to a central atom. (Section 16.10)

  • ozonolysis

    A reaction in which the CRC bond of an alkene is cleaved to form two CRO bonds.

  • photochemical smog

    A complex mixture of undesirable substances produced by the action of sunlight on an urban atmosphere polluted with automobile emissions. The major starting ingredients are nitrogen oxides and organic substances, notably olefins and aldehydes. (Section 18.2)

  • Pro-S-hydrogen

    Replacing this hydrogen by deuterium gives a chiral center with an S confi guration

  • prostaglandins

    Lipids that contain 20 carbon atoms and are characterized by a five-membered ring with two side chains.

  • Steric hindrance

    The ability of groups, because of their size, to hinder access to a reaction site within a molecule.

  • Thermolysis

    Cleavage by heating

  • triglyceride

    A triester formed from glycerol and three long-chain carboxylic acids.

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