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Solutions for Chapter 11: Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Hydrocarbons

Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321908445 | Authors: Karen C. Timberlake

Full solutions for Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321908445

Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321908445 | Authors: Karen C. Timberlake

Solutions for Chapter 11: Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Hydrocarbons

Solutions for Chapter 11
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Textbook: Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry
Edition: 12
Author: Karen C. Timberlake
ISBN: 9780321908445

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, edition: 12. Since 72 problems in chapter 11: Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Hydrocarbons have been answered, more than 64902 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 11: Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Hydrocarbons includes 72 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321908445.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alpha (a) helix

    For proteins, a feature of secondary structure that forms when a portion of the protein twists into a spiral.

  • atom.

    The basic unit of an element that can enter into chemical combination. (2.2)

  • Base peak

    The peak caused by the most abundant ion in a mass spectrum; the most intense peak. It is assigned an arbitrary intensity of 100

  • cation

    A positively charged ion. (Section 2.7)

  • chemical kinetics

    The area of chemistry concerned with the speeds, or rates, at which chemical reactions occur. (Chapter 14: Introduction)

  • Claisen rearrangement

    A [3,3] sigmatropic rearrangement that is observed for allylic vinylic ethers.

  • complementary colors

    Colors that, when mixed in proper proportions, appear white or colorless. (Section 23.5)

  • degenerate

    A situation in which two or more orbitals have the same energy. (Section 6.7)

  • electron shell

    A collection of orbitals that have the same value of n. For example, the orbitals with n = 3 (the 3s, 3p, and 3d orbitals) comprise the third shell. (Section 6.5)

  • first order

    A reaction that has a rate equation in which the sum of all exponents is one.

  • frequency

    The number of times per second that one complete wavelength passes a given point. (Section 6.1)

  • fuel cell

    A voltaic cell that utilizes the oxidation of a conventional fuel, such as H2 or CH4, in the cell reaction. (Section 20.7)

  • hydrophilic

    Water attracting. The term is often used to describe a type of colloid. (Section 13.6)

  • Lindlar catalyst

    Finely powdered palladium metal deposited on solid calcium carbonate that has been specially modifi ed with lead salts. Its particular use is as a catalyst for the reduction of an alkyne to a cis alkene

  • meso compound

    A compound that possesses chirality centers and an internal plane of symmetry.

  • Pro-R-hydrogen

    Replacing this hydrogen by deuterium gives a chiral center with an R confi guration

  • R (Section 3.3)

    From the Latin, rectus, straight, correct; used in the R,S convention to show that the order of priority of groups on a chiral center is clockwise.

  • radiotracer

    A radioisotope that can be used to trace the path of an element in a chemical system. (Section 21.5)

  • regiochemistry

    A term describing a consideration that must be taken into account for a reaction in which two or more constitutional isomers can be formed.

  • secondary

    A term used to indicate that exactly two alkyl groups are attached directly to a particular position. For example, a secondary carbocation has two alkyl groups attached directly to the electrophilic carbon atom (C+).