Make up to $500 this semester by taking notes for StudySoup as an Elite Notetaker Apply Now

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 16: Amino Acids, Proteins, and Enzymes

Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321908445 | Authors: Karen C. Timberlake

Full solutions for Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321908445

Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321908445 | Authors: Karen C. Timberlake

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 16: Amino Acids, Proteins, and Enzymes

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 16
4 5 0 419 Reviews
30
0
Textbook: Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry
Edition: 12
Author: Karen C. Timberlake
ISBN: 9780321908445

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, edition: 12. Since 86 problems in chapter Chapter 16: Amino Acids, Proteins, and Enzymes have been answered, more than 4266 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321908445. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter Chapter 16: Amino Acids, Proteins, and Enzymes includes 86 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Achiral

    An object that lacks chirality; an object that has no handedness

  • alkaline earth metals.

    The Group 2A elements (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra). (2.4)

  • chain-growth polymer

    A polymer that is formed under conditions in which the monomers do not react directly with each other, but rather, each monomer is added to the growing chain, one at a time.

  • Charles’s law

    A law stating that at constant pressure, the volume of a given quantity of gas is proportional to absolute temperature. (Section 10.3)

  • conduction band

    A band of molecular orbitals lying higher in energy than the occupied valence band and distinctly separated from it. (Section 12.7)

  • Crystalline domain

    An ordered crystalline region in the solid state of a polymer. Also called a crystallite.

  • disaccharide

    Carbohydrates comprisedof two monosaccharide units joined via aglycosidic linkage between the anomeric carbonof one monosaccharide and a hydroxyl group ofthe other monosaccharide.

  • Freons

    CFCs that were heavily used for a wide variety of commercial applications, including as refrigerants, as propellants, in the production of foam insulation, as fire-fighting materials, and many other useful applications.

  • hydrocarbons

    Compounds composed of only carbon and hydrogen. (Section 2.9)

  • insulators

    Materials that do not conduct electricity. (Section 12.7)

  • ionic compound

    A compound composed of cations and anions. (Section 2.7)

  • isoelectronic series

    A series of atoms, ions, or molecules having the same number of electrons. (Section 7.3)

  • lone pair

    A pair of unshared, or nonbonding, electrons.

  • Pauli exclusion principle

    The rule that states that an atomic orbital or molecular orbital can accommodate a maximum of two electrons with opposite spin.

  • Pauli exclusion principle

    A rule stating that no two electrons in an atom may have the same four quantum numbers (n, l, ml, and ms). As a reflection of this principle, there can be no more than two electrons in any one atomic orbital. (Section 6.7)

  • protein

    A biopolymer formed from amino acids. (Section 24.7)

  • Schiff base

    An alternative name for an imine

  • scientific law

    A concise verbal statement or a mathematical equation that summarizes a wide range of observations and experiences. (Section 1.3)

  • spin magnetic quantum number 1ms2

    A quantum number associated with the electron spin; it may have values of +12 or -12. (Section 6.7)

  • Wittig reaction

    A reaction that converts an aldehyde or ketone into an alkene, with the introduction of one or more carbon atoms.

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry

Forgot password? Reset password here

Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here