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Solutions for Chapter 4: Three Major Classes of Chemical Reactions

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780073048598 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780073048598

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780073048598 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Solutions for Chapter 4: Three Major Classes of Chemical Reactions

Solutions for Chapter 4
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change
Edition: 5
Author: Martin S. Silberberg
ISBN: 9780073048598

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change , edition: 5. Since 144 problems in chapter 4: Three Major Classes of Chemical Reactions have been answered, more than 76379 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073048598. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 4: Three Major Classes of Chemical Reactions includes 144 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Androgen

    A steroid hormone, such as testosterone, that mediates the development of sexual characteristics of males.

  • anomeric carbon

    The C1 position of the cyclic hemiacetal of an aldose or the C2 position of the cyclic hemiacetal of a ketose.

  • anti addition

    An addition reaction in which two groups are installed on opposite sides of a p bond.

  • biodegradable

    Organic material that bacteria are able to oxidize. (Section 18.4)

  • Bonding molecular orbital

    A molecular orbital in which electrons have a lower energy than they would in isolated atomic orbitals

  • boundary surface diagram.

    Diagram of the region containing a substantial amount of the electron density (about 90 percent) in an orbital. (7.7)

  • chemical kinetics.

    The area of chemistry concerned with the speeds, or rates, at which chemical reactions occur. (13.1)

  • continuous-wave (CW) spectrometer

    An NMR spectrometer that holds the magnetic field constant and slowly sweeps through a range of rf frequencies, monitoring which frequencies are absorbed.

  • d sugar

    A carbohydrate for whichthe chirality center farthest from the carbonylgroup will have an OH group pointing to theright in the Fischer projection.

  • Dihedral angle

    The angle created by two intersecting planes.

  • elementary reaction

    A process in a chemical reaction that occurs in a single step. An overall chemical reaction consists of one or more elementary reactions or steps. (Section 14.6)

  • excited state

    A higher energy state than the ground state. (Section 6.3)

  • Homolytic bond cleavage

    Cleavage of a bond so that each fragment retains one electron; formation of radicals.

  • mercurinium ion

    The intermediateformed during oxymercuration.

  • methyl shift

    A type of carbocation rearrangement in which a methyl group migrates.

  • nitrosonium ion

    The NO+ ion, which is formed when NaNO2 is treated with HCl.

  • photochemical smog

    A complex mixture of undesirable substances produced by the action of sunlight on an urban atmosphere polluted with automobile emissions. The major starting ingredients are nitrogen oxides and organic substances, notably olefins and aldehydes. (Section 18.2)

  • polyatomic ion

    An electrically charged group of two or more atoms. (Section 2.7)

  • shielded

    In NMR spectroscopy,protons or carbon atoms whose surrounding electron density is rich.

  • significant figures

    The digits that indicate the precision with which a measurement is made; all digits of a measured quantity are significant, including the last digit, which is uncertain. (Section 1.5)