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Solutions for Chapter 9: Models of Chemical Bonding

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780073048598 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780073048598

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780073048598 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Solutions for Chapter 9: Models of Chemical Bonding

Solutions for Chapter 9
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change
Edition: 5
Author: Martin S. Silberberg
ISBN: 9780073048598

Chapter 9: Models of Chemical Bonding includes 93 full step-by-step solutions. Since 93 problems in chapter 9: Models of Chemical Bonding have been answered, more than 29407 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change , edition: 5. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073048598.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aldonic acid

    The product obtained when the aldehyde group of an aldose is oxidized.

  • alkoxy substituent

    An OR group.

  • aqueous solution.

    A solution in which the solvent is water. (4.1)

  • Arrhenius equation

    An equation that relates the rate constant for a reaction to the frequency factor, A, the activation energy, Ea, and the temperature, T: k = Ae-Ea>RT. In its logarithmic form it is written ln k = -Ea>RT + ln A. (Section 14.5)

  • cell potential

    The potential difference between the cathode and anode in an electrochemical cell; it is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called electromotive force. (Section 20.4)

  • Chain-growth polymerization

    A polymerization that involves sequential addition reactions, either to unsaturated monomers or to monomers possessing other reactive functional groups.

  • common ion effect.

    The shift in equilibrium caused by the addition of a compound having an ion in common with the dissolved substances. (16.2)

  • compound.

    A substance composed of atoms of two or more elements chemically united in fixed proportions. (1.4)

  • constitutional isomers

    Compounds that have the same molecular formula but differ in the way the atoms are connected.

  • double helix

    The structure for DNA that involves the winding of two DNA polynucleotide chains together in a helical arrangement. The two strands of the double helix are complementary in that the organic bases on the two strands are paired for optimal hydrogen bond interaction. (Section 24.10)

  • element

    A substance consisting of atoms of the same atomic number. Historically defined as a substance that cannot be separated into simpler substances by chemical means. (Sections 1.1 and 1.2)

  • Fluid-mosaic model

    A biological membrane that consists of a phospholipid bilayer with proteins, carbohydrates, and other lipids on the surface and embedded in the bilayer

  • Haworth projection

    A way to view furanose and pyranose forms of monosaccharides. The ring is drawn fl at and most commonly viewed through its edge with the anomeric carbon on the right and the oxygen atom of the ring to the rear

  • ionic solids

    Solids that are composed of ions. (Section 12.1)

  • levorotatory

    A compound thatrotates plane-polarized light in a counterclockwisedirection (-).

  • molecular hydrides

    Compounds formed when hydrogen reacts with nonmetals and metalloids. (Section 22.2)

  • photoelectric effect

    The emission of electrons from a metal surface induced by light. (Section 6.2)

  • spectrochemical series

    A list of ligands arranged in order of their abilities to split the d-orbital energies (using the terminology of the crystal-field model). (Section 23.6)

  • thermosetting resins

    Highly crosslinked polymers that are generally very hard and insoluble.

  • upfield

    The right side of an NMRspectrum.

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