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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 19: Measuring Energy

Full solutions for Living by Chemistry | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781464142314

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 19: Measuring Energy

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Living by Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781464142314. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Living by Chemistry, edition: 2. Chapter Chapter 19: Measuring Energy includes 4 full step-by-step solutions. Since 4 problems in chapter Chapter 19: Measuring Energy have been answered, more than 4829 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aryl amine

    An amine in which the nitrogen atom is connected directly to an aromatic ring.

  • Atactic polymer

    A polymer with completely random confi gurations at the chiral centers along its chain, as, for example, atactic polypropylene

  • concentration cell

    A voltaic cell containing the same electrolyte and the same electrode materials in both the anode and cathode compartments. The emf of the cell is derived from a difference in the concentrations of the same electrolyte solutions in the compartments. (Section 20.6)

  • conjugated

    A compound in which two p bonds are separated from each other by exactly one s bond.

  • coordination number

    The number of adjacent atoms to which an atom is directly bonded. In a complex the coordination number of the metal ion is the number of donor atoms to which it is bonded. (Sections 12.37 and 24.2)

  • crown ether

    Cyclic polyethers whose molecular models resemble crowns.

  • formula weight

    The mass of the collection of atoms represented by a chemical formula. For example, the formula weight of NO2 (46.0 amu) is the sum of the masses of one nitrogen atom and two oxygen atoms. (Section 3.3)

  • fuel value

    The energy released when 1 g of a substance is combusted. (Section 5.8)

  • Heat of combustion (DH0 )

    Standard heat of combustion is the heat released when one mole of a substance in its standard state (gas, liquid, solid) is oxidized completely to carbon dioxide and water.

  • Heterocycle

    A cyclic compound whose ring contains more than one kind of atom. Oxirane (ethylene oxide), for example, is a heterocycle whose ring contains two carbon atoms and one oxygen atom.

  • Heterolytic bond cleavage

    Cleavage of a bond so that one fragment retains both electrons and the other retains none.

  • Lewis structure

    A representation of covalent bonding in a molecule that is drawn using Lewis symbols. Shared electron pairs are shown as lines, and unshared electron pairs are shown as pairs of dots. Only the valence-shell electrons are shown. (Section 8.3)

  • parts per billion (ppb)

    The concentration of a solution in grams of solute per 109 (billion) grams of solution; equals micrograms of solute per liter of solution for aqueous solutions. (Section 13.4)

  • Polymer

    From the Greek, poly 1 meros, meaning many parts. Any long-chain molecule synthesized by linking together many single parts called monomers

  • Polyunsaturated fatty acid

    A fatty acid with two or more carbon-carbon double bonds in its hydrocarbon chain

  • quaternary structure

    The structure of a protein resulting from the clustering of several individual protein chains into a final specific shape. (Section 24.7)

  • sulfoxide

    A compound containing an SRO bond that is flanked on both sides by R groups.

  • tetrahedral intermediate

    An intermediate with tetrahedral geometry. This type of intermediate is formed when a nucleophile attacks the carbonyl group of a carboxylic acid derivative.

  • torsional strain

    The difference in energy between staggered and eclipsed conformations (for example, in ethane).

  • weak activators

    Groups that weakly activate an aromatic ring toward electrophilic aromatic substitution, thereby enhancing the rate of the reaction.

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