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Modern Chemistry 1st Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Modern Chemistry | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030735462 | Authors: Rinehart & Winston Holt

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780030735462

Modern Chemistry | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030735462 | Authors: Rinehart & Winston Holt

Modern Chemistry | 1st Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Modern Chemistry was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780030735462. Since problems from 23 chapters in Modern Chemistry have been answered, more than 4328 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Modern Chemistry were answered by Patricia, our top Chemistry solution expert on 03/16/18, 03:02PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry, edition: 1. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 23.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • amorphous solid.

    A solid that lacks a regular three-dimensional arrangement of atoms or molecules. (11.7)

  • bond-line structures

    The most common drawing style employed by organic chemists. All carbon atoms and most hydrogen atoms are implied but not explicitly drawn in a bond-line structure.

  • critical pressure

    The pressure at which a gas at its critical temperature is converted to a liquid state. (Section 11.4)

  • Disproportionation

    A termination process that involves the abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the beta position of the propagating radical of one chain by the radical endgroup of another chain.

  • effusion

    The escape of a gas through an orifice or hole. (Section 10.8)

  • elementary reaction

    A process in a chemical reaction that occurs in a single step. An overall chemical reaction consists of one or more elementary reactions or steps. (Section 14.6)

  • haloalkane

    An organic compound containing at least one halogen.

  • Heat of combustion (DH0 )

    Standard heat of combustion is the heat released when one mole of a substance in its standard state (gas, liquid, solid) is oxidized completely to carbon dioxide and water.

  • Homolytic bond cleavage

    Cleavage of a bond so that each fragment retains one electron; formation of radicals.

  • Hydrogen bonding

    The attractive interaction between a hydrogen atom bonded to an atom of high electronegativity (most commonly O or N) and a lone pair of electrons on another atom of high electronegativity (again, most commonly O or N).

  • Hydrophobic effect

    The tendency of nonpolar groups to cluster so as to shield them from contact with an aqueous environment.

  • Infrared (IR) spectroscopy

    A spectroscopic technique in which a compound is irradiated with infrared radiation, absorption of which causes covalent bonds to change from a lower vibration state to a higher one. Infrared spectroscopy is particularly valuable for determining the kinds of functional groups present in a molecule.

  • Markovnikov addition

    In additionreactions, the observation that the hydrogen atomis generally placed at the vinylic position alreadybearing the larger number of hydrogen atoms.

  • oxaphosphetane

    An intermediate that is believed to be formed during Wittig reactions.

  • parts per million (ppm)

    The concentration of a solution in grams of solute per 106 (million) grams of solution; equals milligrams of solute per liter of solution for aqueous solutions. (Section 13.4)

  • physical properties

    Properties that can be measured without changing the composition of a substance, for example, color and freezing point. (Section 1.3)

  • Rearrangement

    A change in connectivity of the atoms in a product compared with the con nectivity of the same atoms in the starting material.

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • sp-hybridized

    Atomic orbitals that are achieved by mathematically averaging one s orbital with only one p orbital to form two hybridized atomic orbitals.

  • twist boat

    A conformation of cyclohexane that is lower in energy than a boat conformation but higher in energy than a chair conformation.

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