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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 11: Reactions of Alcohols

Organic Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321811394 | Authors: L.g. Wade, Jr.

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780321811394

Organic Chemistry | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321811394 | Authors: L.g. Wade, Jr.

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 11: Reactions of Alcohols

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 11
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Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 8
Author: L.g. Wade, Jr.
ISBN: 9780321811394

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 64 problems in chapter Chapter 11: Reactions of Alcohols have been answered, more than 22607 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 8. Chapter Chapter 11: Reactions of Alcohols includes 64 full step-by-step solutions. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321811394.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acidic anhydride (acidic oxide)

    An oxide that forms an acid when added to water; soluble nonmetal oxides are acidic anhydrides. (Section 22.5)

  • activation energy (Ea)

    The minimum energy needed for reaction; the height of the energy barrier to formation of products. (Section 14.5)

  • acyl peroxide

    A peroxide for which each oxygen atom is connected to an acyl group. Acyl peroxides are often used as radical initiators, because the O!O bond is especially weak.

  • aldehyde

    An organic compound that contains a carbonyl group 1C “O2 to which at least one hydrogen atom is attached. (Section 24.4)

  • concentration cell

    A voltaic cell containing the same electrolyte and the same electrode materials in both the anode and cathode compartments. The emf of the cell is derived from a difference in the concentrations of the same electrolyte solutions in the compartments. (Section 20.6)

  • condensed structure

    A drawing style in which none of the bonds are drawn. Groups of atoms are clustered together when possible. For example, isopropanol has two CH3 groups, both of which are connected to the central carbon atom, shown like this: (CH3)2CHOH.

  • crown ether

    Cyclic polyethers whose molecular models resemble crowns.

  • cycloalkanes.

    Alkanes whose carbon atoms are joined in rings. (24.2)

  • density

    The ratio of an object’s mass to its volume. (Section 1.4)

  • Dipeptide

    A molecule containing two amino acid units joined by a peptide bond

  • fats

    Triglycerides that are solids atroom temperature.

  • Fischer projection

    A twodimensional representation of a molecule; in these projections, groups on the right and left are by convention in front, while those at the top and bottom are to the rear.

  • hydrohalogenation

    A reaction that involves the addition of H and X (either Br or Cl) across an alkene.

  • magnetic moment

    A magneticfield generated by a spinning proton.

  • metallic solids

    Solids that are composed of metal atoms. (Section 12.1)

  • Polarimeter

    An instrument for measuring the ability of a compound to rotate the plane of plane-polarized light.

  • R (Section 3.3)

    From the Latin, rectus, straight, correct; used in the R,S convention to show that the order of priority of groups on a chiral center is clockwise.

  • reverse osmosis

    The process by which water molecules move under high pressure through a semipermeable membrane from the more concentrated to the less concentrated solution. (Section 18.4)

  • solution alloy

    A homogeneous alloy, where two or more elements are distributed randomly and uniformly throughout the solid. (Section 12.3)

  • spontaneous process

    A process that is capable of proceeding in a given direction, as written or described, without needing to be driven by an outside source of energy. A process may be spontaneous even though it is very slow. (Section 19.1)