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Textbooks / Chemistry / Organic Chemistry 6

Organic Chemistry 6th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781936221349 | Authors: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition

ISBN: 9781936221349

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781936221349 | Authors: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Solutions by Chapter
4 5 0 358 Reviews
Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 6
Author: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise
ISBN: 9781936221349

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 6. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Organic Chemistry were answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 03/16/18, 03:35PM. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 239. Since problems from 239 chapters in Organic Chemistry have been answered, more than 126378 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781936221349.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alkylation

    A reaction that achieves the installation of an alkyl group. For example, an SN2 reaction in which an alkyl group is connected to an attacking nucleophile.

  • atomic mass.

    The mass of an atom in atomic mass units. (3.1)

  • Brønsted-Lowry base

    A compound that can serve as a proton acceptor.

  • calcination

    The heating of an ore to bring about its decomposition and the elimination of a volatile product. For example, a carbonate ore might be calcined to drive off CO2. (Section 23.2)

  • chemical kinetics

    The area of chemistry concerned with the speeds, or rates, at which chemical reactions occur. (Chapter 14: Introduction)

  • chemical nomenclature

    The rules used in naming substances. (Section 2.8)

  • Chiral

    From the Greek, cheir meaning hand; an object that is not superposable on its mirror image; an object that has handedness.

  • Codon

    A triplet of nucleotides on mRNA that directs incorporation of a specifi c amino acid into a polypeptide sequence.

  • colloid.

    A dispersion of particles of one substance (the dispersed phase) throughout a dispersing medium made of another substance. (12.8)

  • Gibbs free energy change (DG°)

    The energy that dictates the position of chemical equilibria and rates of chemical reactions. A thermodynamic function of enthalpy, entropy, and temperature, given by the equation DG° 5 DH° 2 TDS°. If DG° , 0, the position of equilibria for the reaction favors products. If DG° . 0, the position of equilibria favors reactants.

  • Haloalkane (alkyl halide)

    A compound containing a halogen atom covalently bonded to an sp3 -hybridized carbon atom. Given the symbol R!X.

  • Haworth projection

    For substituted cycloalkanes, a drawing style used to clearly identify which groups are above the ring and which groups are below the ring. (See also Sect. 4.14.)

  • hydroperoxide

    A compound with the structure R!O!O!H.

  • reductive amination

    The conversion of a ketone or aldehyde into an imine under conditions in which the imine is reduced as soon as it is formed, giving an amine.

  • regioselective

    A reaction that can produce two or more constitutional isomers but nevertheless produces one as the major product.

  • Staggered conformation

    A conformation about a carbon-carbon single bond in which the atoms or groups on one carbon are as far apart as possible from atoms or groups on an adjacent carbon.

  • sulfonation

    An electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction in which an SO3H group is installed on an aromatic ring.

  • syn addition

    An addition reaction in which two groups are added to the same face of a p bond.

  • Tautomers

    Constitutional isomers in equilibrium with each other that differ in the location of a hydrogen atom and a double bond relative to a heteroatom, most commonly O, N, or S.

  • Tripeptide

    A molecule containing three amino acid units, each joined to the next by a peptide bond