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Solutions for Chapter 10.5: Conversion of AlCohols into Alkyl hAlides: summAry

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781936221349 | Authors: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition

ISBN: 9781936221349

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781936221349 | Authors: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise

Solutions for Chapter 10.5: Conversion of AlCohols into Alkyl hAlides: summAry

Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781936221349. Chapter 10.5: Conversion of AlCohols into Alkyl hAlides: summAry includes 3 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 6. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 3 problems in chapter 10.5: Conversion of AlCohols into Alkyl hAlides: summAry have been answered, more than 36953 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • bond length.

    The distance between the nuclei of two bonded atoms in a molecule. (9.4)

  • critical mass.

    The minimum mass of fissionable material required to generate a self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. (19.5)

  • effective nuclear charge

    The net positive charge experienced by an electron in a many-electron atom; this charge is not the full nuclear charge because there is some shielding of the nucleus by the other electrons in the atom. (Section 7.2)

  • electronic structure

    The arrangement of electrons in an atom or molecule. (Chapter 6:Introduction)

  • Fourier-transform NMR (FT-NMR)

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a technique in which the sample is irradiated with a short pulse that covers the entire range of relevant rf frequencies.

  • Gabriel synthesis

    A method forpreparing primary amines that avoids formation of secondary and tertiary amines.

  • greenhouse gases

    Gases in an atmosphere that absorb and emit infrared radiation (radiant heat), “trapping” heat in the atmosphere. (Section 18.2)

  • Ground state

    The lowest energy state of a system.

  • Hund’s rule

    When considering electrons in atomic orbitals, a rule that states that one electron is placed in each degenerate orbital first, before electrons are paired up.

  • hydrochlorofluorocarbons, (HCFCs)

    Compounds that are similar in structure to CFCs but also possess at least one C!Hbond.

  • mass

    A measure of the amount of material in an object. It measures the resistance of an object to being moved. In SI units, mass is measured in kilograms. (Section 1.4)

  • net ionic equation

    A chemical equation for a solution reaction in which soluble strong electrolytes are written as ions and spectator ions are omitted. (Section 4.2)

  • Prochiral hydrogens

    Refers to two hydrogens bonded to a carbon atom. When a different atom replaces one or the other, the carbon becomes a chiral center. The hydrogens of the CH2 group of ethanol, for example, are prochiral. Replacing one of them by deuterium gives (R)-1-deuteroethanol; replacing the other gives (S)-1-deuteroethanol

  • propagation

    For radical reactions,the steps whose sum gives the net chemical reaction.

  • property

    A characteristic that gives a sample of matter its unique identity. (Section 1.1)

  • pyranose ring

    A six-membered cyclic hemiacetal form of a carbohydrate.

  • resonance

    A method that chemists use to deal with the inadequacy of bond-line drawings.

  • Specifi c rotation

    The observed rotation of the plane of polarized light when a sample is placed in a tube 1.0 dm in length and at a concentration of 1 g/mL for a solution. For a pure liquid, concentration is expressed in g/mL (density).

  • upfield

    The right side of an NMRspectrum.

  • zwitterion

    A net neutral compound that exhibits charge separation. Amino acids exist as zwitterions at physiological pH.

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