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Solutions for Chapter 8.13: More Examples that Show How Delocalized Electrons Increase Stability

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780321803221 | Authors: Paula Yurkanis Bruice

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780321803221

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780321803221 | Authors: Paula Yurkanis Bruice

Solutions for Chapter 8.13: More Examples that Show How Delocalized Electrons Increase Stability

Chapter 8.13: More Examples that Show How Delocalized Electrons Increase Stability includes 3 full step-by-step solutions. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321803221. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 7. Since 3 problems in chapter 8.13: More Examples that Show How Delocalized Electrons Increase Stability have been answered, more than 42559 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alkaloid

    A basic nitrogen-containing compound of plant origin, many of which are physiologically active when administered to humans.

  • amino acid residue

    The individual repeating units in a polypeptide chain or protein.

  • anode.

    The electrode at which oxidation occurs. (18.2)

  • chiral

    A term describing a molecule or an ion that cannot be superimposed on its mirror image. (Sections 23.4 and 24.5)

  • Conjugation

    A situation in which two multiple bonds are separated by a single bond. Alternatively, a series of overlapping 2p orbitals. 1,3-butadiene, for example, is a conjugated diene, and 3-butene-2-one is a conjugated enone

  • Cyanohydrin

    A molecule containing an !OH group and a !CN group bonded to the same carbon.

  • Edman degradation

    A method for analyzing the sequence of amino acids in apeptide by removing one amino acid residue at a time and identifying each residue as it is removed.

  • Fischer projections

    A drawing style that is often used when dealing with compounds bearing multiple chirality centers, especially for carbohydrates. (See also Sect. 5.7.)

  • haloalkane

    An organic compound containing at least one halogen.

  • Hofmann elimination

    When treated with a strong base, a quaternary ammonium halide undergoes b-elimination by an E2 mechanism to give the less-substituted alkene as the major product

  • keto-enol tautomerization

    The equilibrium that is established between an enol and a ketone in either acid-catalyzed or basecatalyzed conditions.

  • Ketone

    A compound containing a carbonyl group bonded to two carbons.

  • Newman projection

    A way to view a molecule by looking along a carbon-carbon single bond

  • oxidation number (oxidation state)

    A positive or negative whole number assigned to an element in a molecule or ion on the basis of a set of formal rules; to some degree it reflects the positive or negative character of that atom. (Section 4.4)

  • oxyanion

    A polyatomic anion that contains one or more oxygen atoms. (Section 2.8)

  • rearrangement

    One of the four arrow-pushing patterns for ionic reactions.

  • Retrosynthesis

    A process of reasoning backwards from a target molecule to a suitable set of starting materials.

  • Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation

    A reaction that converts an alkene into an epoxide via a stereospecific pathway.

  • Vibrational infrared region

    A common type of spin-spin coupling involving the H atoms on two C atoms that are bonded to each other.

  • Wittig reagent

    A reagent used to perform a Wittig reaction.