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Solutions for Chapter 8.16: Delocalized Electrons Can Affect the Product of a Reaction

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780321803221 | Authors: Paula Yurkanis Bruice

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780321803221

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780321803221 | Authors: Paula Yurkanis Bruice

Solutions for Chapter 8.16: Delocalized Electrons Can Affect the Product of a Reaction

Solutions for Chapter 8.16
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Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321803221. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 7. Since 2 problems in chapter 8.16: Delocalized Electrons Can Affect the Product of a Reaction have been answered, more than 84295 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 8.16: Delocalized Electrons Can Affect the Product of a Reaction includes 2 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Aprotic solvent

    A solvent that cannot serve as a hydrogen-bond donor; nowhere in the molecule is there a hydrogen bonded to an atom of high electronegativity. Common aprotic solvents are dichloromethane, diethyl ether, and dimethyl sulfoxide

  • Benzyl group (C6H5CH2!)

    The group derived from toluene by removing a hydrogen from its methyl group.

  • Brønsted–Lowry acid

    A substance (molecule or ion) that acts as a proton donor. (Section 16.2)

  • chiral

    An object that is not superimposable on its mirror image.

  • critical temperature (Tc).

    The temperature above which a gas will not liquefy. (11.8)

  • dextrorotatory, or merely dextro or d

    A term used to label a chiral molecule that rotates the plane of polarization of plane-polarized light to the right (clockwise). (Section 23.4)

  • dipole–dipole force

    A force that becomes significant when polar molecules come in close contact with one another. The force is attractive when the positive end of one polar molecule approaches the negative end of another. (Section 11.2)

  • electrometallurgy

    The use of electrolysis to reduce or refine metals. (Section 20.9)

  • electron capture

    A mode of radioactive decay in which an inner-shell orbital electron is captured by the nucleus. (Section 21.1)

  • equilibrium

    For a reaction, a state in which there is no longer an observable change in the concentrations of reactants and products.

  • Exothermic reaction

    A reaction in which the enthalpy of the products is lower than that of the reactants; a reaction in which heat is released.

  • Fischer esterifi cation

    The process of forming an ester by refl uxing a carboxylic acid and an alcohol in the presence of an acid catalyst, commonly H2SO4, ArSO3H, or HCl

  • hydride shift

    A type of carbocation rearrangement that involves the migration of a hydride ion (H-).

  • hydrogen bonding

    A special type of dipole-dipole interaction that occurs between an electronegative atom and a hydrogen atom that is connected to another electronegative atom.

  • Newman projection

    A drawing style that is designed to show the conformation of a molecule.

  • photoionization

    The removal of an electron from an atom or molecule by absorption of light. (Section 18.2)

  • retrosynthetic analysis

    A systematic set of principles that enable the design of a synthetic route by working backward from the desired product.

  • steric number

    The total of (single bonds + lone pairs) for an atom in a compound.

  • structural proteins

    Fibrous proteins that are used for their structural rigidity. Examples include a-keratins found in hair, nails, skin, feathers, and wool.

  • Tripeptide

    A molecule containing three amino acid units, each joined to the next by a peptide bond