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Solutions for Chapter 14.5: High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Can Reveal Molecular Formulas

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780321803221 | Authors: Paula Yurkanis Bruice

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780321803221

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780321803221 | Authors: Paula Yurkanis Bruice

Solutions for Chapter 14.5: High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Can Reveal Molecular Formulas

Solutions for Chapter 14.5
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Chapter 14.5: High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Can Reveal Molecular Formulas includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321803221. Since 2 problems in chapter 14.5: High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Can Reveal Molecular Formulas have been answered, more than 35370 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 7. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 1,4-adduct

    The product obtained from 1,4-addition across a conjugated p system.

  • Anabolic steroid

    A steroid hormone, such as testosterone, that promotes tissue and muscle growth and development

  • angle strain

    The increase in energy associated with a bond angle that has deviated from the preferred angle of 109.5°.

  • bond enthalpy

    The enthalpy change, ?H, required to break a particular bond when the substance is in the gas phase. (Section 8.8)

  • Boyle’s law

    A law stating that at constant temperature, the product of the volume and pressure of a given amount of gas is a constant. (Section 10.3)

  • calorimetry

    The experimental measurement of heat produced in chemical and physical processes. (Section 5.5)

  • chemical formula

    A notation that uses chemical symbols with numerical subscripts to convey the relative proportions of atoms of the different elements in a substance. (Section 2.6)

  • double helix

    The structure for DNA that involves the winding of two DNA polynucleotide chains together in a helical arrangement. The two strands of the double helix are complementary in that the organic bases on the two strands are paired for optimal hydrogen bond interaction. (Section 24.10)

  • Energy diagram

    A graph showing the changes in energy that occur during a chemical reaction; energy is plotted on the vertical axis, and reaction progress is plotted on the horizontal axis. Also called a reaction coordinate diagram

  • First ionization potential

    The energy needed to remove the most loosely held electron from an atom or molecule.

  • Formal charge

    The charge on an atom in a polyatomic ion or molecule

  • Inductive effect

    The polarization of the electron density of a covalent bond caused by the electronegativity of a nearby atom.

  • Melt transition (Tm)

    The temperature at which crystalline regions of a polymer melt.

  • oxyacid

    A compound in which one or more OH groups, and possibly additional oxygen atoms, are bonded to a central atom. (Section 16.10)

  • peptide bond

    A bond formed between two amino acids. (Section 24.7)

  • phase change

    The conversion of a substance from one state of matter to another. The phase changes we consider are melting and freezing 1solid ? liquid2, sublimation and deposition, and vaporization and condensation 1liquid ? gas2. (Section 11.4)

  • Primary (1°) amine

    An amine in which nitrogen is bonded to one carbon and two hydrogens

  • significant figures

    The digits that indicate the precision with which a measurement is made; all digits of a measured quantity are significant, including the last digit, which is uncertain. (Section 1.5)

  • Stereochemistry

    The study of three-dimensional arrangements of atoms in molecules

  • strong deactivators

    Groups that strongy deactivate an aromatic ring toward electrophilic aromatic substitution, thereby significantly decreasing the rate of the reaction.

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