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Solutions for Chapter 11: EDTA Titration

Quantitative Chemical Analysis | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781429218153 | Authors: Daniel C. Harris

Full solutions for Quantitative Chemical Analysis | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9781429218153

Quantitative Chemical Analysis | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781429218153 | Authors: Daniel C. Harris

Solutions for Chapter 11: EDTA Titration

Solutions for Chapter 11
4 5 0 359 Reviews
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Textbook: Quantitative Chemical Analysis
Edition: 8
Author: Daniel C. Harris
ISBN: 9781429218153

Since 46 problems in chapter 11: EDTA Titration have been answered, more than 125615 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Quantitative Chemical Analysis, edition: 8. Quantitative Chemical Analysis was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781429218153. Chapter 11: EDTA Titration includes 46 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aromatic

    A compound containing a planar ring of continuously overlapping p orbitals with 4n+2p electrons.

  • cathode.

    The electrode at which reduction occurs. (18.2)

  • Conjugate acid

    The species formed when a base accepts a proton from an acid

  • electrometallurgy

    The use of electrolysis to reduce or refine metals. (Section 20.9)

  • epoxide

    A cyclic ether containing a three-membered ring system. Also called an oxirane (also see Sect. 14.7).

  • Fat

    A mixture of triglycerides that is semisolid or solid at room temperature.

  • fragmentation

    In mass spectrometry, when the molecular ion breaks apart into fragments.

  • Hammond’s postulate

    The structure of the transition state for an exothermic step looks more like the reactants of that step than the products. Conversely, the structure of the transition state for an endothermic step looks more like the products of that step than the reactants.

  • law of definite proportions

    A law that states that the elemental composition of a pure substance is always the same, regardless of its source; also called the law of constant composition. (Section 1.2)

  • levorotatory

    A compound thatrotates plane-polarized light in a counterclockwisedirection (-).

  • limiting reactant (limiting reagent)

    The reactant present in the smallest stoichiometric quantity in a mixture of reactants; the amount of product that can form is limited by the complete consumption of the limiting reactant. (Section 3.7)

  • living polymer

    A polymer that isformed via anionic polymerization.

  • parts per billion (ppb)

    The concentration of a solution in grams of solute per 109 (billion) grams of solution; equals micrograms of solute per liter of solution for aqueous solutions. (Section 13.4)

  • Planck constant (h)

    The constant that relates the energy and frequency of a photon, E = hn. Its value is 6.626 * 10-34 J@s. (Section 6.2)

  • Polarizability

    A measure of the ease of distortion of the distribution of electron density about an atom or group in response to interaction with other molecules or ions. Fluorine which has a high electronegativity and holds its electrons tightly, has a very low polarizability. Iodine, which has a lower electronegativity and holds its electrons less tightly, has a very high polarizability.

  • quaternary ammonium salt

    An ionic compound containing a positively charged nitrogen atom connected to four alkyl groups.

  • SI units

    The preferred metric units for use in science. (Section 1.4)

  • silica

    Common name for silicon dioxide. (Section 22.4)

  • Stereospecific reaction

    A special type of stereoselective reaction in which the stereochemistry of the product is dependent on the stereochemistry of the starting material.

  • weak deactivators

    Groups that weakly deactivate an aromatic ring toward electrophilic aromatic substitution, thereby decreasing the rate of the reaction.