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Solutions for Chapter 8: An Introduction to Chemistry 2nd Edition

An Introduction to Chemistry | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9780073511078 | Authors: Richard C. Bauer

Full solutions for An Introduction to Chemistry | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9780073511078

An Introduction to Chemistry | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9780073511078 | Authors: Richard C. Bauer

Solutions for Chapter 8

Solutions for Chapter 8
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Textbook: An Introduction to Chemistry
Edition: 2
Author: Richard C. Bauer
ISBN: 9780073511078

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: An Introduction to Chemistry , edition: 2. Chapter 8 includes 136 full step-by-step solutions. An Introduction to Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073511078. Since 136 problems in chapter 8 have been answered, more than 36693 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aldose

    A carbohydrate that contains an aldehyde group.

  • antioxidants

    Radical scavengers that prevent autooxidation by preventing radical chain reactions from beginning.

  • atomic radius.

    One-half the distance between the two nuclei in two adjacent atoms of the same element in a metal. For elements that exist as diatomic units, the atomic radius is one-half the distance between the nuclei of the two atoms in a particular molecule. (8.3)

  • bond cleavage

    The breaking of a bond, either homolytically or heterolytically. bond dissociation energy (Sect. 6.1): The energy required to achieve homolytic bond cleavage (generating radicals).

  • Born–Haber cycle

    A thermodynamic cycle based on Hess’s law that relates the lattice energy of an ionic substance to its enthalpy of formation and to other measurable quantities. (Section 8.2)

  • Conjugate addition

    Addition of a nucleophile to the b-carbon of an a,b-unsaturated carbonyl compound. (Section 20.2A) Addition to carbons 1 and 4 of a conjugated diene.

  • effusion

    The escape of a gas through an orifice or hole. (Section 10.8)

  • electron-domain geometry

    The three- dimensional arrangement of the electron domains around an atom according to the VSEPR model. (Section 9.2)

  • Exergonic reaction

    A reaction in which the Gibbs free energy of the products is lower than that of the reactants. The position of equilibrium for an exergonic reaction favors products.

  • globular proteins

    Proteins that consist of chains that are coiled into compact shapes.

  • Lipid

    A biomolecule isolated from plant or animal sources by extraction with nonpolar organic solvents, such as diethyl ether and hexane.

  • mineral

    A solid, inorganic substance occurring in nature, such as calcium carbonate, which occurs as calcite. (Section 23.1)

  • net ionic equation

    A chemical equation for a solution reaction in which soluble strong electrolytes are written as ions and spectator ions are omitted. (Section 4.2)

  • nucleophilic attack

    One of the four arrow-pushing patterns for ionic reactions.

  • peptide bond

    The amide linkage by which two amino acids are coupled together to form peptides.

  • petroleum

    A naturally occurring combustible liquid composed of hundreds of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds. (Section 5.8)

  • pi (p) bond

    A bond formed from adjacent, overlapping p orbitals.

  • Resonance energy

    The difference in energy between a resonance hybrid and the most stable of its hypothetical contributing structures in which electrons are localized on particular atoms and in particular bonds.

  • retro-aldol reaction

    The reverse of an aldol reaction. A b-hydroxyketone or aldehyde is converted into two ketones or aldehydes.

  • steroids

    Lipids that are based on a tetracyclic ring system involving three six-membered rings and one five-membered ring. Cholesterol is an example.

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