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Solutions for Chapter 23: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Solutions for Chapter 23

Solutions for Chapter 23
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 13
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780321910417

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 23 includes 203 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. Since 203 problems in chapter 23 have been answered, more than 177941 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • bond length

    The distance between the centers of two bonded atoms. (Section 8.3)

  • Charles’s law

    A law stating that at constant pressure, the volume of a given quantity of gas is proportional to absolute temperature. (Section 10.3)

  • d sugar

    A carbohydrate for whichthe chirality center farthest from the carbonylgroup will have an OH group pointing to theright in the Fischer projection.

  • dextrorotatory

    A compound that rotates plane-polarized light in a clockwise direction (+).

  • diagnostic region

    The region of an IR spectrum that contains signals that arise from double bonds, triple bonds, and X!H bonds.

  • Diaxial interactions

    Refers to the steric strain arising from interaction between an axial substituent and an axial hydrogen (or other group) on the same side of a chair conformation of a cyclohexane ring

  • geminal

    Two groups connected to the same carbon atom. For example, a geminal dihalide is a compound with two halogens connected to the same carbon atom.

  • ionic compound

    A compound composed of cations and anions. (Section 2.7)

  • isotactic

    A polymer in which the repeating units contain chirality centers which all have the same configuration.

  • Ketone

    A compound containing a carbonyl group bonded to two carbons.

  • melt transition temperature (Tm)

    The temperature at which the crystallineregions of a polymer become amorphous.

  • nonaromatic

    A compound that lacks a ring with a continuous system of overlapping p orbitals.

  • Nucleophilic acyl substitution

    A reaction in which a nucleophile bonded to the carbon of an acyl group is replaced by another nucleophile.

  • optical isomerism

    A form of isomerism in which the two forms of a compound (stereoisomers) are nonsuperimposable mirror images. (Section 23.4)

  • pi 1P2 bond

    A covalent bond in which electron density is concentrated above and below the internuclear axis. (Section 9.6)

  • Primary structure of proteins

    The sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain, read from the N-terminal amino acid to the C-terminal amino acid.

  • Principle of microscopic reversibility

    This principle states that the sequence of transition states and reactive intermediates in the mechanism of any reversible reaction must be the same, but in reverse order, for the reverse reaction as for the forward reaction

  • Pro-S-hydrogen

    Replacing this hydrogen by deuterium gives a chiral center with an S confi guration

  • proteins

    Polypeptide chains comprised of more than 40 or 50 amino acids.

  • VSEPR theory

    Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion theory, which can be used to predict the geometry around an atom.

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