Solutions for Chapter 2.3SE: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Solutions for Chapter 2.3SE

Solutions for Chapter 2.3SE
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This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by Sieva Kozinsky and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 2 problems in chapter 2.3SE have been answered, more than 123120 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 2.3SE includes 2 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • absolute zero

    The lowest attainable temperature; 0 K on the Kelvin scale and -273.15 °C on the Celsius scale. (Section 1.4)

  • Addition reaction

    A reaction in which two atoms or groups of atoms react with a double bond, forming a compound with the two new groups bonded to the carbons of the original double bond.

  • alkenes.

    Hydrocarbons that contain one or more carbon-carbon double bonds. They have the general formula CnH2n, where n 5 2,3, . . . . (24.2)

  • basic oxide (basic anhydride)

    An oxide that either reacts with water to form a base or reacts with an acid to form a salt and water. (Section 22.5)

  • Born-Haber cycle.

    The cycle that relates lattice energies of ionic compounds to ionization energies, electron affinities, heats of sublimation and formation, and bond enthalpies. (9.3)

  • chemical equation.

    An equation that uses chemical symbols to show what happens during a chemical reaction. (3.7)

  • crystal field splitting (D).

    The energy difference between two sets of d orbitals in a metal atom when ligands are present. (23.5)

  • electron

    A negatively charged subatomic particle found outside the atomic nucleus; it is a part of all atoms. An electron has a mass 1>1836 times that of a proton. (Section 2.3)

  • Electronegativity

    A measure of the force of an atom’s attraction for electrons

  • Enantiomers

    Stereoisomers that are nonsuperposable mirror images of each other; refers to a relationship between pairs of objects

  • glycogen

    The general name given to a group of polysaccharides of glucose that are synthesized in mammals and used to store energy from carbohydrates. (Section 24.7)

  • Histone

    A protein, particularly rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine, that is found associated with DNA molecules

  • polar aprotic solvent

    A solvent that lacks hydrogen atoms connected directly to an electronegative atom.

  • polyurethanes

    Polymers made up of repeating urethane groups, also sometimes called carbamate groups (!N!CO2!).

  • pyrimidine

    A compound that is similar in structure to pyridine but contains one extra nitrogen atom at the 3 position.

  • Reductive amination

    A method for preparing substituted amines by treating an aldehyde or ketone with an amine in the presence of a reducing agent

  • smectic liquid crystalline phase

    A liquid crystal in which the molecules are aligned along their long axes and arranged in sheets, with the ends of the molecules aligned. There are several different kinds of smectic phases. (Section 12.8)

  • tetrahedral intermediate

    An intermediate with tetrahedral geometry. This type of intermediate is formed when a nucleophile attacks the carbonyl group of a carboxylic acid derivative.

  • transport protein

    A protein used to transport molecules or ions from one location to another. Hemoglobin is a classic example of a transport protein, used to transport molecular oxygen from the lungs to all the tissues of the body.

  • Vinylic carbocation

    A double-helix model for the secondary structure of a DNA molecule

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