Solutions for Chapter 24.5SE: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Solutions for Chapter 24.5SE

Solutions for Chapter 24.5SE
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Chapter 24.5SE includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 2 problems in chapter 24.5SE have been answered, more than 145755 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • (PAHs)

    Compounds containing multiple aromatic rings fused together.

  • Annulene

    A cyclic hydrocarbon with a continuous alternation of single and double bonds.

  • base peak

    In mass spectrometry, the tallest peak in the spectrum, which is assigned a relative value of 100%.

  • catenation.

    The ability of the atoms of an element to form bonds with one another. (22.3)

  • chair conformation

    The lowest energy conformation for cyclohexane, in which all bond angles are fairly close to 109.5° and all hydrogen atoms are staggered.

  • chelate effect

    The generally larger formation constants for polydentate ligands as compared with the corresponding monodentate ligands. (Section 23.3)

  • Coupling constant

    The separation on an NMR spectrum (in hertz) between adjacent peaks in a multiplet and a quantitative measure of the infl uence of the spin-spin coupling with adjacent nuclei.

  • critical temperature

    The highest temperature at which it is possible to convert the gaseous form of a substance to a liquid. The critical temperature increases with an increase in the magnitude of intermolecular forces. (Section 11.4)

  • crystal field splitting (D).

    The energy difference between two sets of d orbitals in a metal atom when ligands are present. (23.5)

  • d-Monosaccharide

    A monosaccharide that, when written as a Fischer projection, has the !OH on its penultimate carbon to the right.

  • diol

    A compound containing two hydroxyl groups (OH).

  • Henderson–Hasselbalch equation

    The relationship among the pH, pKa, and the concentrations of acid and conjugate base in an aqueous solution: pH = pKa + log 3base4 3acid4. (Section 17.2)

  • lock-and-key model

    A model of enzyme action in which the substrate molecule is pictured as fitting rather specifically into the active site on the enzyme. It is assumed that in being bound to the active site, the substrate is somehow activated for reaction. (Section 14.7)

  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)

    Plasma particles, density 1.02–1.06 g/mL, consisting of approximately 26% proteins, 50% cholesterol, 21% phospholipids, and 4% triglycerides.

  • molecular orbital (MO)

    An allowed state for an electron in a molecule. According to molecular-orbital theory, a molecular orbital is entirely analogous to an atomic orbital, which is an allowed state for an electron in an atom. Most bonding molecular orbitals can be classified as s or p, depending on the disposition of electron density with respect to the internuclear axis. (Section 9.7)

  • nuclear model

    Model of the atom with a nucleus containing protons and neutrons and with electrons in the space outside the nucleus. (Section 2.2)

  • Pericyclic reaction

    A reaction that takes place in a single step, without intermediates, and involves a cyclic redistribution of bonding electrons

  • Polycarbonate

    A polyester in which the carboxyl groups are derived from carbonic acid

  • Secondary structure of proteins

    The ordered arrangements (conformations) of amino acids in localized regions of a polypeptide or protein

  • three-center, two-electron bonds

    A bond in which two electrons are associated with three atoms, such as in diborane (B2H6).

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