×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Chemistry - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Chemistry - Textbook Survival Guide

Solutions for Chapter 24.8SE: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Solutions for Chapter 24.8SE

Solutions for Chapter 24.8SE
4 5 0 236 Reviews
19
5

Chapter 24.8SE includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. Since 2 problems in chapter 24.8SE have been answered, more than 261125 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alkyne

    An unsaturated hydrocarbon that contains one or more carbon-carbon triple bonds.

  • Avogadro’s law.

    At constant pressure and temperature, the volume of a gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of the gas present. (5.3)

  • Azeotrope

    A liquid mixture of constant composition with a boiling point that is different from that of any of its components.

  • beta (b) pleated sheet

    For proteins, a feature of secondary structure that forms when two or more protein chains line up side-by-side.

  • cell potential

    The potential difference between the cathode and anode in an electrochemical cell; it is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called electromotive force. (Section 20.4)

  • Charles’s law

    A law stating that at constant pressure, the volume of a given quantity of gas is proportional to absolute temperature. (Section 10.3)

  • Equatorial bond

    A bond to a chair conformation of cyclohexane that extends from the ring roughly perpendicular to the imaginary axis through the center of the ring; a bond that lies roughly along the equator of a cyclohexane ring

  • Fishhook arrow

    A barbed curved arrow used to show the change in position of a single electron.

  • Henderson–Hasselbalch equation

    The relationship among the pH, pKa, and the concentrations of acid and conjugate base in an aqueous solution: pH = pKa + log 3base4 3acid4. (Section 17.2)

  • hydrogen bonding

    Bonding that results from intermolecular attractions between molecules containing hydrogen bonded to an electronegative element. The most important examples involve OH, NH, and HF. (Section 11.2)

  • hydrohalogenation

    A reaction that involves the addition of H and X (either Br or Cl) across an alkene.

  • LUMO

    The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital.

  • Node

    A point in space where the value of a wave function is zero

  • orbital

    An allowed energy state of an electron in the quantum mechanical model of the atom; the term orbital is also used to describe the spatial distribution of the electron. An orbital is defined by the values of three quantum numbers: n, l, and ml (Section 6.5)

  • oxymercuration-demercuration

    A two-step process for the Markovnikov addition of water across an alkene. With this process, carbocation rearrangements do not occur.

  • Peptide bond

    The special name given to the amide bond formed between the a-amino group of one amino acid and the a-carboxyl group of another amino acid

  • solubility-product constant (solubility product)1Ksp2

    An equilibrium constant related to the equilibrium between a solid salt and its ions in solution. It provides a quantitative measure of the solubility of a slightly soluble salt. (Section 17.4)

  • transport protein

    A protein used to transport molecules or ions from one location to another. Hemoglobin is a classic example of a transport protein, used to transport molecular oxygen from the lungs to all the tissues of the body.

  • twist boat

    A conformation of cyclohexane that is lower in energy than a boat conformation but higher in energy than a chair conformation.

  • Unimolecular reaction

    A reaction in which only one species is involved in the rate-determining step

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Chemistry - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Chemistry - Textbook Survival Guide
×
Reset your password