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Solutions for Chapter 4.12SE: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Solutions for Chapter 4.12SE

Solutions for Chapter 4.12SE
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Since 2 problems in chapter 4.12SE have been answered, more than 217358 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 4.12SE includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alcohol

    An organic compound obtained by substituting a hydroxyl group 1¬OH2 for a hydrogen on a hydrocarbon. (Sections 2.9 and 24.4)

  • back-side attack

    In SN2 reactions, the side opposite the leaving group, which is where the nucleophile attacks.

  • Bile acid

    A cholesterol-derived detergent molecule, such as cholic acid, which is secreted by the gallbladder into the intestine to assist in the absorption of dietary lipids.

  • bond dipole

    The dipole moment that is due to unequal electron sharing between two atoms in a covalent bond. (Section 9.3)

  • catalyst

    A substance that changes the speed of a chemical reaction without itself undergoing a permanent chemical change in the process. (Section 14.7)

  • Charles’ law.

    The volume of a fixed amount of gas maintained at constant pressure is directly proportional to the absolute temperature of the gas. (5.3)

  • conrotatory

    In electrocyclic reactions,a type of rotation in which the orbitals being used to form the new s bond must rotate in the same way.

  • diagnostic region

    The region of an IR spectrum that contains signals that arise from double bonds, triple bonds, and X!H bonds.

  • disaccharide

    Carbohydrates comprisedof two monosaccharide units joined via aglycosidic linkage between the anomeric carbonof one monosaccharide and a hydroxyl group ofthe other monosaccharide.

  • Electron affinity

    Energy added or released when an electron is added to an atom or molecule.

  • f-block metals

    Lanthanide and actinide elements in which the 4f or 5f orbitals are partially occupied. (Section 6.9)

  • greenhouse gases

    Gases in an atmosphere that absorb and emit infrared radiation (radiant heat), “trapping” heat in the atmosphere. (Section 18.2)

  • petroleum

    A naturally occurring combustible liquid composed of hundreds of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds. (Section 5.8)

  • Protecting group

    Reversibly creating an unreactive group for the purpose of preventing a functional group from potentially reacting to give an unwanted product or products

  • resonance stabilization

    The stabilization associated with the delocalization of electrons via resonance.

  • sigma complex

    The positively charged intermediate of an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction.

  • Stereoisomers

    Isomers that have the same molecular formula and the same connectivity of their atoms but a different orientation of their atoms in space

  • trivalent

    An element, such as nitrogen, that forms three bonds.

  • Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR)

    A method for predicting bond angles based on the idea that electron pairs repel each other and keep as far apart as possible.

  • Zaitsev’s rule

    A rule stating that the major product of a b-elimination reaction is the most stable alkene; that is, it is the alkene with the greatest number of substituents on the carboncarbon double bond

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