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Solutions for Chapter 5.4SE: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Solutions for Chapter 5.4SE

Solutions for Chapter 5.4SE
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This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by Sieva Kozinsky and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 2 problems in chapter 5.4SE have been answered, more than 65296 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 5.4SE includes 2 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acyl peroxide

    A peroxide for which each oxygen atom is connected to an acyl group. Acyl peroxides are often used as radical initiators, because the O!O bond is especially weak.

  • battery.

    A galvanic cell, or a series of combined galvanic cells, that can be used as a source of direct electric current at a constant voltage. (18.6)

  • boiling point.

    The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the external atmospheric pressure. (11.8)

  • bond order

    The number of bonding electron pairs shared between two atoms, minus the number of antibonding electron pairs: bond order = (number of bonding electrons - number of antibonding electrons)/2. (Section 9.7)

  • doping

    Incorporation of a hetero atom into a solid to change its electrical properties. For example, incorporation of P into Si. (Section 12.7)

  • Fat

    A mixture of triglycerides that is semisolid or solid at room temperature.

  • gauche conformation

    A conformation that exhibits a gauche interaction.

  • hybrid orbital

    An orbital that results from the mixing of different kinds of atomic orbitals on the same atom. For example, an sp3 hybrid results from the mixing, or hybridizing, of one s orbital and three p orbitals. (Section 9.5)

  • hydrogen bonding

    Bonding that results from intermolecular attractions between molecules containing hydrogen bonded to an electronegative element. The most important examples involve OH, NH, and HF. (Section 11.2)

  • intensive property

    A property that is independent of the amount of material considered, for example, density. (Section 1.3)

  • kinetics

    A term that refers to the rate of a reaction.

  • Lewis structures

    A drawing style inwhich the electrons take center stage.linear polymer (Sect. 27.6): A polymer thathas only a minimal amount of branching or nobranching at all.

  • nonbonding pair

    In a Lewis structure a pair of electrons assigned completely to one atom; also called a lone pair. (Section 9.2)

  • Optically active

    Refers to a compound that rotates the plane of plane-polarized light

  • photodissociation

    The breaking of a molecule into two or more neutral fragments as a result of absorption of light. (Section 18.2)

  • Principle of microscopic reversibility

    This principle states that the sequence of transition states and reactive intermediates in the mechanism of any reversible reaction must be the same, but in reverse order, for the reverse reaction as for the forward reaction

  • prosthetic group

    A nonprotein unit attached to a protein, such as heme in hemoglobin.

  • rearrangement

    One of the four arrow-pushing patterns for ionic reactions.

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • Soap

    A sodium or potassium salt of a fatty acid

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