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Solutions for Chapter 10.5SE: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Solutions for Chapter 10.5SE

Solutions for Chapter 10.5SE
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This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Since 2 problems in chapter 10.5SE have been answered, more than 244504 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 10.5SE includes 2 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • amine

    A compound that has the general formula R3N, where R may be H or a hydrocarbon group. (Section 16.7)

  • Correlation tables

    Tables of data on absorption patterns of functional groups.

  • Diol

    A compound containing two hydroxyl groups

  • dipole–dipole force

    A force that becomes significant when polar molecules come in close contact with one another. The force is attractive when the positive end of one polar molecule approaches the negative end of another. (Section 11.2)

  • electron domain

    In the VSEPR model, a region about a central atom in which an electron pair is concentrated. (Section 9.2)

  • Hemiacetal

    A molecule containing an !OH and an !OR or !OAr group bonded to the same carbon

  • high-spin complex

    A complex whose electrons populate the d orbitals to give the maximum number of unpaired electrons. (Section 23.6)

  • hydrolysis

    A reaction in which bonds are cleaved by treatment with water.

  • law of mass action

    The rules by which the equilibrium constant is expressed in terms of the concentrations of reactants and products, in accordance with the balanced chemical equation for the reaction. (Section 15.2)

  • Mass spectrum

    A plot of the relative abundance of ions versus their mass-to-charge ratio

  • Molecular dipole moment (m)

    The vector sum of individual bond dipoles.

  • Optical purity

    The specifi c rotation of a mixture of enantiomers divided by the specifi c rotation of the enantiomerically pure substance (expressed as a percent). Optical purity is numerically equal to enantiomeric excess, but experimentally determined.

  • oxidizing agent, or oxidant

    The substance that is reduced and thereby causes the oxidation of some other substance in an oxidation–reduction reaction. (Section 20.1)

  • paramagnetism

    A property that a substance possesses if it contains one or more unpaired electrons. A paramagnetic substance is drawn into a magnetic field. (Section 9.8)

  • pi 1P2 molecular orbital

    A molecular orbital that concentrates the electron density on opposite sides of an imaginary line that passes through the nuclei. (Section 9.8)

  • R,S System

    A set of rules for specifying absolute confi guration about a chiral center; also called the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog system

  • radiotracer

    A radioisotope that can be used to trace the path of an element in a chemical system. (Section 21.5)

  • reducing agent, or reductant

    The substance that is oxidized and thereby causes the reduction of some other substance in an oxidation–reduction reaction. (Section 20.1)

  • Tertiary structure of proteins

    The three-dimensional arrangement in space of all atoms in a single polypeptide chain.

  • transport protein

    A protein used to transport molecules or ions from one location to another. Hemoglobin is a classic example of a transport protein, used to transport molecular oxygen from the lungs to all the tissues of the body.

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