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Solutions for Chapter 23.6: Flows in Networks

Advanced Engineering Mathematics | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780471488859 | Authors: Erwin Kreyszig

Full solutions for Advanced Engineering Mathematics | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780471488859

Advanced Engineering Mathematics | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780471488859 | Authors: Erwin Kreyszig

Solutions for Chapter 23.6: Flows in Networks

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, edition: 9. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Advanced Engineering Mathematics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780471488859. Since 20 problems in chapter 23.6: Flows in Networks have been answered, more than 44508 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 23.6: Flows in Networks includes 20 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Change of basis matrix M.

    The old basis vectors v j are combinations L mij Wi of the new basis vectors. The coordinates of CI VI + ... + cnvn = dl wI + ... + dn Wn are related by d = M c. (For n = 2 set VI = mll WI +m21 W2, V2 = m12WI +m22w2.)

  • Circulant matrix C.

    Constant diagonals wrap around as in cyclic shift S. Every circulant is Col + CIS + ... + Cn_lSn - l . Cx = convolution c * x. Eigenvectors in F.

  • Companion matrix.

    Put CI, ... ,Cn in row n and put n - 1 ones just above the main diagonal. Then det(A - AI) = ±(CI + c2A + C3A 2 + .•. + cnA n-l - An).

  • Distributive Law

    A(B + C) = AB + AC. Add then multiply, or mUltiply then add.

  • Echelon matrix U.

    The first nonzero entry (the pivot) in each row comes in a later column than the pivot in the previous row. All zero rows come last.

  • Eigenvalue A and eigenvector x.

    Ax = AX with x#-O so det(A - AI) = o.

  • Elimination matrix = Elementary matrix Eij.

    The identity matrix with an extra -eij in the i, j entry (i #- j). Then Eij A subtracts eij times row j of A from row i.

  • Fourier matrix F.

    Entries Fjk = e21Cijk/n give orthogonal columns FT F = nI. Then y = Fe is the (inverse) Discrete Fourier Transform Y j = L cke21Cijk/n.

  • Free variable Xi.

    Column i has no pivot in elimination. We can give the n - r free variables any values, then Ax = b determines the r pivot variables (if solvable!).

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Inverse matrix A-I.

    Square matrix with A-I A = I and AA-l = I. No inverse if det A = 0 and rank(A) < n and Ax = 0 for a nonzero vector x. The inverses of AB and AT are B-1 A-I and (A-I)T. Cofactor formula (A-l)ij = Cji! detA.

  • Left inverse A+.

    If A has full column rank n, then A+ = (AT A)-I AT has A+ A = In.

  • Length II x II.

    Square root of x T x (Pythagoras in n dimensions).

  • Multiplicities AM and G M.

    The algebraic multiplicity A M of A is the number of times A appears as a root of det(A - AI) = O. The geometric multiplicity GM is the number of independent eigenvectors for A (= dimension of the eigenspace).

  • Network.

    A directed graph that has constants Cl, ... , Cm associated with the edges.

  • Orthogonal subspaces.

    Every v in V is orthogonal to every w in W.

  • Permutation matrix P.

    There are n! orders of 1, ... , n. The n! P 's have the rows of I in those orders. P A puts the rows of A in the same order. P is even or odd (det P = 1 or -1) based on the number of row exchanges to reach I.

  • Saddle point of I(x}, ... ,xn ).

    A point where the first derivatives of I are zero and the second derivative matrix (a2 II aXi ax j = Hessian matrix) is indefinite.

  • Similar matrices A and B.

    Every B = M-I AM has the same eigenvalues as A.

  • Spectrum of A = the set of eigenvalues {A I, ... , An}.

    Spectral radius = max of IAi I.

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