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Solutions for Chapter 2.5: First-Order Differential Equations

Differential Equations with Boundary-Value Problems, | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827069 | Authors: Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright

Full solutions for Differential Equations with Boundary-Value Problems, | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9781111827069

Differential Equations with Boundary-Value Problems, | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827069 | Authors: Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright

Solutions for Chapter 2.5: First-Order Differential Equations

Solutions for Chapter 2.5
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Textbook: Differential Equations with Boundary-Value Problems,
Edition: 8
Author: Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright
ISBN: 9781111827069

Chapter 2.5: First-Order Differential Equations includes 38 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 38 problems in chapter 2.5: First-Order Differential Equations have been answered, more than 21242 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Differential Equations with Boundary-Value Problems,, edition: 8. Differential Equations with Boundary-Value Problems, was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781111827069.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Associative Law (AB)C = A(BC).

    Parentheses can be removed to leave ABC.

  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

    A factorization of the Fourier matrix Fn into e = log2 n matrices Si times a permutation. Each Si needs only nl2 multiplications, so Fnx and Fn-1c can be computed with ne/2 multiplications. Revolutionary.

  • Fibonacci numbers

    0,1,1,2,3,5, ... satisfy Fn = Fn-l + Fn- 2 = (A7 -A~)I()q -A2). Growth rate Al = (1 + .J5) 12 is the largest eigenvalue of the Fibonacci matrix [ } A].

  • Graph G.

    Set of n nodes connected pairwise by m edges. A complete graph has all n(n - 1)/2 edges between nodes. A tree has only n - 1 edges and no closed loops.

  • Hessenberg matrix H.

    Triangular matrix with one extra nonzero adjacent diagonal.

  • Independent vectors VI, .. " vk.

    No combination cl VI + ... + qVk = zero vector unless all ci = O. If the v's are the columns of A, the only solution to Ax = 0 is x = o.

  • Kirchhoff's Laws.

    Current Law: net current (in minus out) is zero at each node. Voltage Law: Potential differences (voltage drops) add to zero around any closed loop.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Multiplier eij.

    The pivot row j is multiplied by eij and subtracted from row i to eliminate the i, j entry: eij = (entry to eliminate) / (jth pivot).

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Orthogonal subspaces.

    Every v in V is orthogonal to every w in W.

  • Orthonormal vectors q 1 , ... , q n·

    Dot products are q T q j = 0 if i =1= j and q T q i = 1. The matrix Q with these orthonormal columns has Q T Q = I. If m = n then Q T = Q -1 and q 1 ' ... , q n is an orthonormal basis for Rn : every v = L (v T q j )q j •

  • Pascal matrix

    Ps = pascal(n) = the symmetric matrix with binomial entries (i1~;2). Ps = PL Pu all contain Pascal's triangle with det = 1 (see Pascal in the index).

  • Positive definite matrix A.

    Symmetric matrix with positive eigenvalues and positive pivots. Definition: x T Ax > 0 unless x = O. Then A = LDLT with diag(D» O.

  • Semidefinite matrix A.

    (Positive) semidefinite: all x T Ax > 0, all A > 0; A = any RT R.

  • Singular matrix A.

    A square matrix that has no inverse: det(A) = o.

  • Toeplitz matrix.

    Constant down each diagonal = time-invariant (shift-invariant) filter.

  • Trace of A

    = sum of diagonal entries = sum of eigenvalues of A. Tr AB = Tr BA.

  • Tridiagonal matrix T: tij = 0 if Ii - j I > 1.

    T- 1 has rank 1 above and below diagonal.

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