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Solutions for Chapter 5.5: Multiplying Polynomials

Beginning Algebra | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780321673480 | Authors: Margaret L. Lial John Hornsby, Terry McGinnis

Full solutions for Beginning Algebra | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780321673480

Beginning Algebra | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780321673480 | Authors: Margaret L. Lial John Hornsby, Terry McGinnis

Solutions for Chapter 5.5: Multiplying Polynomials

Solutions for Chapter 5.5
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Textbook: Beginning Algebra
Edition: 11
Author: Margaret L. Lial John Hornsby, Terry McGinnis
ISBN: 9780321673480

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 104 problems in chapter 5.5: Multiplying Polynomials have been answered, more than 40210 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 5.5: Multiplying Polynomials includes 104 full step-by-step solutions. Beginning Algebra was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321673480. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Beginning Algebra, edition: 11.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Affine transformation

    Tv = Av + Vo = linear transformation plus shift.

  • Complete solution x = x p + Xn to Ax = b.

    (Particular x p) + (x n in nullspace).

  • Determinant IAI = det(A).

    Defined by det I = 1, sign reversal for row exchange, and linearity in each row. Then IAI = 0 when A is singular. Also IABI = IAIIBI and

  • Diagonalizable matrix A.

    Must have n independent eigenvectors (in the columns of S; automatic with n different eigenvalues). Then S-I AS = A = eigenvalue matrix.

  • Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

    A factorization of the Fourier matrix Fn into e = log2 n matrices Si times a permutation. Each Si needs only nl2 multiplications, so Fnx and Fn-1c can be computed with ne/2 multiplications. Revolutionary.

  • Independent vectors VI, .. " vk.

    No combination cl VI + ... + qVk = zero vector unless all ci = O. If the v's are the columns of A, the only solution to Ax = 0 is x = o.

  • Jordan form 1 = M- 1 AM.

    If A has s independent eigenvectors, its "generalized" eigenvector matrix M gives 1 = diag(lt, ... , 1s). The block his Akh +Nk where Nk has 1 's on diagonall. Each block has one eigenvalue Ak and one eigenvector.

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Linear transformation T.

    Each vector V in the input space transforms to T (v) in the output space, and linearity requires T(cv + dw) = c T(v) + d T(w). Examples: Matrix multiplication A v, differentiation and integration in function space.

  • Multiplication Ax

    = Xl (column 1) + ... + xn(column n) = combination of columns.

  • Nullspace matrix N.

    The columns of N are the n - r special solutions to As = O.

  • Nullspace N (A)

    = All solutions to Ax = O. Dimension n - r = (# columns) - rank.

  • Pivot columns of A.

    Columns that contain pivots after row reduction. These are not combinations of earlier columns. The pivot columns are a basis for the column space.

  • Plane (or hyperplane) in Rn.

    Vectors x with aT x = O. Plane is perpendicular to a =1= O.

  • Schwarz inequality

    Iv·wl < IIvll IIwll.Then IvTAwl2 < (vT Av)(wT Aw) for pos def A.

  • Semidefinite matrix A.

    (Positive) semidefinite: all x T Ax > 0, all A > 0; A = any RT R.

  • Simplex method for linear programming.

    The minimum cost vector x * is found by moving from comer to lower cost comer along the edges of the feasible set (where the constraints Ax = b and x > 0 are satisfied). Minimum cost at a comer!

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.

  • Spectral Theorem A = QAQT.

    Real symmetric A has real A'S and orthonormal q's.

  • Symmetric matrix A.

    The transpose is AT = A, and aU = a ji. A-I is also symmetric.