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Solutions for Chapter 7.2: Multiplying and Dividing Rational Expressions

Beginning Algebra | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780321673480 | Authors: Margaret L. Lial John Hornsby, Terry McGinnis

Full solutions for Beginning Algebra | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780321673480

Beginning Algebra | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780321673480 | Authors: Margaret L. Lial John Hornsby, Terry McGinnis

Solutions for Chapter 7.2: Multiplying and Dividing Rational Expressions

Solutions for Chapter 7.2
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Textbook: Beginning Algebra
Edition: 11
Author: Margaret L. Lial John Hornsby, Terry McGinnis
ISBN: 9780321673480

Since 70 problems in chapter 7.2: Multiplying and Dividing Rational Expressions have been answered, more than 37928 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Beginning Algebra was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321673480. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Beginning Algebra, edition: 11. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 7.2: Multiplying and Dividing Rational Expressions includes 70 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Cramer's Rule for Ax = b.

    B j has b replacing column j of A; x j = det B j I det A

  • Factorization

    A = L U. If elimination takes A to U without row exchanges, then the lower triangular L with multipliers eij (and eii = 1) brings U back to A.

  • Free variable Xi.

    Column i has no pivot in elimination. We can give the n - r free variables any values, then Ax = b determines the r pivot variables (if solvable!).

  • Incidence matrix of a directed graph.

    The m by n edge-node incidence matrix has a row for each edge (node i to node j), with entries -1 and 1 in columns i and j .

  • Independent vectors VI, .. " vk.

    No combination cl VI + ... + qVk = zero vector unless all ci = O. If the v's are the columns of A, the only solution to Ax = 0 is x = o.

  • Kirchhoff's Laws.

    Current Law: net current (in minus out) is zero at each node. Voltage Law: Potential differences (voltage drops) add to zero around any closed loop.

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Markov matrix M.

    All mij > 0 and each column sum is 1. Largest eigenvalue A = 1. If mij > 0, the columns of Mk approach the steady state eigenvector M s = s > O.

  • Minimal polynomial of A.

    The lowest degree polynomial with meA) = zero matrix. This is peA) = det(A - AI) if no eigenvalues are repeated; always meA) divides peA).

  • Orthogonal matrix Q.

    Square matrix with orthonormal columns, so QT = Q-l. Preserves length and angles, IIQxll = IIxll and (QX)T(Qy) = xTy. AlllAI = 1, with orthogonal eigenvectors. Examples: Rotation, reflection, permutation.

  • Partial pivoting.

    In each column, choose the largest available pivot to control roundoff; all multipliers have leij I < 1. See condition number.

  • Pascal matrix

    Ps = pascal(n) = the symmetric matrix with binomial entries (i1~;2). Ps = PL Pu all contain Pascal's triangle with det = 1 (see Pascal in the index).

  • Projection p = a(aTblaTa) onto the line through a.

    P = aaT laTa has rank l.

  • Reduced row echelon form R = rref(A).

    Pivots = 1; zeros above and below pivots; the r nonzero rows of R give a basis for the row space of A.

  • Reflection matrix (Householder) Q = I -2uuT.

    Unit vector u is reflected to Qu = -u. All x intheplanemirroruTx = o have Qx = x. Notice QT = Q-1 = Q.

  • Singular Value Decomposition

    (SVD) A = U:E VT = (orthogonal) ( diag)( orthogonal) First r columns of U and V are orthonormal bases of C (A) and C (AT), AVi = O'iUi with singular value O'i > O. Last columns are orthonormal bases of nullspaces.

  • Skew-symmetric matrix K.

    The transpose is -K, since Kij = -Kji. Eigenvalues are pure imaginary, eigenvectors are orthogonal, eKt is an orthogonal matrix.

  • Spectral Theorem A = QAQT.

    Real symmetric A has real A'S and orthonormal q's.

  • Symmetric matrix A.

    The transpose is AT = A, and aU = a ji. A-I is also symmetric.

  • Transpose matrix AT.

    Entries AL = Ajj. AT is n by In, AT A is square, symmetric, positive semidefinite. The transposes of AB and A-I are BT AT and (AT)-I.

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