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Solutions for Chapter 6.5: Finite Difference Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Full solutions for Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780321797056

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Solutions for Chapter 6.5: Finite Difference Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Chapter 6.5: Finite Difference Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations includes 7 full step-by-step solutions. Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321797056. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 7 problems in chapter 6.5: Finite Difference Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations have been answered, more than 8748 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems, edition: 5.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Cholesky factorization

    A = CTC = (L.J]))(L.J]))T for positive definite A.

  • Complete solution x = x p + Xn to Ax = b.

    (Particular x p) + (x n in nullspace).

  • Cross product u xv in R3:

    Vector perpendicular to u and v, length Ilullllvlll sin el = area of parallelogram, u x v = "determinant" of [i j k; UI U2 U3; VI V2 V3].

  • Diagonal matrix D.

    dij = 0 if i #- j. Block-diagonal: zero outside square blocks Du.

  • Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

    A factorization of the Fourier matrix Fn into e = log2 n matrices Si times a permutation. Each Si needs only nl2 multiplications, so Fnx and Fn-1c can be computed with ne/2 multiplications. Revolutionary.

  • Fourier matrix F.

    Entries Fjk = e21Cijk/n give orthogonal columns FT F = nI. Then y = Fe is the (inverse) Discrete Fourier Transform Y j = L cke21Cijk/n.

  • Hilbert matrix hilb(n).

    Entries HU = 1/(i + j -1) = Jd X i- 1 xj-1dx. Positive definite but extremely small Amin and large condition number: H is ill-conditioned.

  • Independent vectors VI, .. " vk.

    No combination cl VI + ... + qVk = zero vector unless all ci = O. If the v's are the columns of A, the only solution to Ax = 0 is x = o.

  • Left nullspace N (AT).

    Nullspace of AT = "left nullspace" of A because y T A = OT.

  • Length II x II.

    Square root of x T x (Pythagoras in n dimensions).

  • Projection matrix P onto subspace S.

    Projection p = P b is the closest point to b in S, error e = b - Pb is perpendicularto S. p 2 = P = pT, eigenvalues are 1 or 0, eigenvectors are in S or S...L. If columns of A = basis for S then P = A (AT A) -1 AT.

  • Pseudoinverse A+ (Moore-Penrose inverse).

    The n by m matrix that "inverts" A from column space back to row space, with N(A+) = N(AT). A+ A and AA+ are the projection matrices onto the row space and column space. Rank(A +) = rank(A).

  • Rank one matrix A = uvT f=. O.

    Column and row spaces = lines cu and cv.

  • Schur complement S, D - C A -} B.

    Appears in block elimination on [~ g ].

  • Semidefinite matrix A.

    (Positive) semidefinite: all x T Ax > 0, all A > 0; A = any RT R.

  • Singular matrix A.

    A square matrix that has no inverse: det(A) = o.

  • Singular Value Decomposition

    (SVD) A = U:E VT = (orthogonal) ( diag)( orthogonal) First r columns of U and V are orthonormal bases of C (A) and C (AT), AVi = O'iUi with singular value O'i > O. Last columns are orthonormal bases of nullspaces.

  • Triangle inequality II u + v II < II u II + II v II.

    For matrix norms II A + B II < II A II + II B IIĀ·

  • Vector addition.

    v + w = (VI + WI, ... , Vn + Wn ) = diagonal of parallelogram.

  • Vector space V.

    Set of vectors such that all combinations cv + d w remain within V. Eight required rules are given in Section 3.1 for scalars c, d and vectors v, w.