×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide

Solutions for Chapter 10.5: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Full solutions for Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780321797056

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Solutions for Chapter 10.5: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations

Solutions for Chapter 10.5
4 5 0 285 Reviews
23
4
Textbook: Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems
Edition: 5
Author: Richard Haberman
ISBN: 9780321797056

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems, edition: 5. Chapter 10.5: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations includes 20 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 20 problems in chapter 10.5: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations have been answered, more than 8801 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321797056.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Companion matrix.

    Put CI, ... ,Cn in row n and put n - 1 ones just above the main diagonal. Then det(A - AI) = ±(CI + c2A + C3A 2 + .•. + cnA n-l - An).

  • Diagonal matrix D.

    dij = 0 if i #- j. Block-diagonal: zero outside square blocks Du.

  • Fibonacci numbers

    0,1,1,2,3,5, ... satisfy Fn = Fn-l + Fn- 2 = (A7 -A~)I()q -A2). Growth rate Al = (1 + .J5) 12 is the largest eigenvalue of the Fibonacci matrix [ } A].

  • Free variable Xi.

    Column i has no pivot in elimination. We can give the n - r free variables any values, then Ax = b determines the r pivot variables (if solvable!).

  • Fundamental Theorem.

    The nullspace N (A) and row space C (AT) are orthogonal complements in Rn(perpendicular from Ax = 0 with dimensions rand n - r). Applied to AT, the column space C(A) is the orthogonal complement of N(AT) in Rm.

  • Gauss-Jordan method.

    Invert A by row operations on [A I] to reach [I A-I].

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Hankel matrix H.

    Constant along each antidiagonal; hij depends on i + j.

  • Hypercube matrix pl.

    Row n + 1 counts corners, edges, faces, ... of a cube in Rn.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Least squares solution X.

    The vector x that minimizes the error lie 112 solves AT Ax = ATb. Then e = b - Ax is orthogonal to all columns of A.

  • Multiplier eij.

    The pivot row j is multiplied by eij and subtracted from row i to eliminate the i, j entry: eij = (entry to eliminate) / (jth pivot).

  • Pivot columns of A.

    Columns that contain pivots after row reduction. These are not combinations of earlier columns. The pivot columns are a basis for the column space.

  • Projection matrix P onto subspace S.

    Projection p = P b is the closest point to b in S, error e = b - Pb is perpendicularto S. p 2 = P = pT, eigenvalues are 1 or 0, eigenvectors are in S or S...L. If columns of A = basis for S then P = A (AT A) -1 AT.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Rayleigh quotient q (x) = X T Ax I x T x for symmetric A: Amin < q (x) < Amax.

    Those extremes are reached at the eigenvectors x for Amin(A) and Amax(A).

  • Skew-symmetric matrix K.

    The transpose is -K, since Kij = -Kji. Eigenvalues are pure imaginary, eigenvectors are orthogonal, eKt is an orthogonal matrix.

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.

  • Transpose matrix AT.

    Entries AL = Ajj. AT is n by In, AT A is square, symmetric, positive semidefinite. The transposes of AB and A-I are BT AT and (AT)-I.

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide
×
Reset your password