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Solutions for Chapter 10.7: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Full solutions for Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780321797056

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321797056 | Authors: Richard Haberman

Solutions for Chapter 10.7: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations

Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321797056. Chapter 10.7: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations includes 6 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 6 problems in chapter 10.7: Infinite Domain Problems: Fourier Transform Solutions of Partial Differential Equations have been answered, more than 8049 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems, edition: 5.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Adjacency matrix of a graph.

    Square matrix with aij = 1 when there is an edge from node i to node j; otherwise aij = O. A = AT when edges go both ways (undirected). Adjacency matrix of a graph. Square matrix with aij = 1 when there is an edge from node i to node j; otherwise aij = O. A = AT when edges go both ways (undirected).

  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Column picture of Ax = b.

    The vector b becomes a combination of the columns of A. The system is solvable only when b is in the column space C (A).

  • Complex conjugate

    z = a - ib for any complex number z = a + ib. Then zz = Iz12.

  • Diagonalization

    A = S-1 AS. A = eigenvalue matrix and S = eigenvector matrix of A. A must have n independent eigenvectors to make S invertible. All Ak = SA k S-I.

  • Ellipse (or ellipsoid) x T Ax = 1.

    A must be positive definite; the axes of the ellipse are eigenvectors of A, with lengths 1/.JI. (For IIx II = 1 the vectors y = Ax lie on the ellipse IIA-1 yll2 = Y T(AAT)-1 Y = 1 displayed by eigshow; axis lengths ad

  • Hankel matrix H.

    Constant along each antidiagonal; hij depends on i + j.

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Markov matrix M.

    All mij > 0 and each column sum is 1. Largest eigenvalue A = 1. If mij > 0, the columns of Mk approach the steady state eigenvector M s = s > O.

  • Minimal polynomial of A.

    The lowest degree polynomial with meA) = zero matrix. This is peA) = det(A - AI) if no eigenvalues are repeated; always meA) divides peA).

  • Partial pivoting.

    In each column, choose the largest available pivot to control roundoff; all multipliers have leij I < 1. See condition number.

  • Particular solution x p.

    Any solution to Ax = b; often x p has free variables = o.

  • Pascal matrix

    Ps = pascal(n) = the symmetric matrix with binomial entries (i1~;2). Ps = PL Pu all contain Pascal's triangle with det = 1 (see Pascal in the index).

  • Projection p = a(aTblaTa) onto the line through a.

    P = aaT laTa has rank l.

  • Rank one matrix A = uvT f=. O.

    Column and row spaces = lines cu and cv.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Schwarz inequality

    Iv·wl < IIvll IIwll.Then IvTAwl2 < (vT Av)(wT Aw) for pos def A.

  • Simplex method for linear programming.

    The minimum cost vector x * is found by moving from comer to lower cost comer along the edges of the feasible set (where the constraints Ax = b and x > 0 are satisfied). Minimum cost at a comer!

  • Spectrum of A = the set of eigenvalues {A I, ... , An}.

    Spectral radius = max of IAi I.

  • Transpose matrix AT.

    Entries AL = Ajj. AT is n by In, AT A is square, symmetric, positive semidefinite. The transposes of AB and A-I are BT AT and (AT)-I.

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