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Textbooks / Math / Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction 1

Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction 1st Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781285463247 | Authors: David Poole

Full solutions for Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9781285463247

Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781285463247 | Authors: David Poole

Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction | 1st Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Solutions by Chapter
4 5 0 432 Reviews

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 7. Since problems from 7 chapters in Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction have been answered, more than 631 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction were answered by , our top Math solution expert on 03/05/18, 07:41PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, edition: 1. Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781285463247.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Associative Law (AB)C = A(BC).

    Parentheses can be removed to leave ABC.

  • Cramer's Rule for Ax = b.

    B j has b replacing column j of A; x j = det B j I det A

  • Diagonalization

    A = S-1 AS. A = eigenvalue matrix and S = eigenvector matrix of A. A must have n independent eigenvectors to make S invertible. All Ak = SA k S-I.

  • Dimension of vector space

    dim(V) = number of vectors in any basis for V.

  • Distributive Law

    A(B + C) = AB + AC. Add then multiply, or mUltiply then add.

  • Dot product = Inner product x T y = XI Y 1 + ... + Xn Yn.

    Complex dot product is x T Y . Perpendicular vectors have x T y = O. (AB)ij = (row i of A)T(column j of B).

  • Elimination matrix = Elementary matrix Eij.

    The identity matrix with an extra -eij in the i, j entry (i #- j). Then Eij A subtracts eij times row j of A from row i.

  • Elimination.

    A sequence of row operations that reduces A to an upper triangular U or to the reduced form R = rref(A). Then A = LU with multipliers eO in L, or P A = L U with row exchanges in P, or E A = R with an invertible E.

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Hilbert matrix hilb(n).

    Entries HU = 1/(i + j -1) = Jd X i- 1 xj-1dx. Positive definite but extremely small Amin and large condition number: H is ill-conditioned.

  • Indefinite matrix.

    A symmetric matrix with eigenvalues of both signs (+ and - ).

  • Left inverse A+.

    If A has full column rank n, then A+ = (AT A)-I AT has A+ A = In.

  • Length II x II.

    Square root of x T x (Pythagoras in n dimensions).

  • Linear transformation T.

    Each vector V in the input space transforms to T (v) in the output space, and linearity requires T(cv + dw) = c T(v) + d T(w). Examples: Matrix multiplication A v, differentiation and integration in function space.

  • Lucas numbers

    Ln = 2,J, 3, 4, ... satisfy Ln = L n- l +Ln- 2 = A1 +A~, with AI, A2 = (1 ± -/5)/2 from the Fibonacci matrix U~]' Compare Lo = 2 with Fo = O.

  • Nullspace N (A)

    = All solutions to Ax = O. Dimension n - r = (# columns) - rank.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Semidefinite matrix A.

    (Positive) semidefinite: all x T Ax > 0, all A > 0; A = any RT R.

  • Spanning set.

    Combinations of VI, ... ,Vm fill the space. The columns of A span C (A)!

  • Toeplitz matrix.

    Constant down each diagonal = time-invariant (shift-invariant) filter.