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Solutions for Chapter 2-3: Multiplying And Dividing Rational Expressions

Amsco's Algebra 2 and Trigonometry | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781567657029 | Authors: Gantert

Full solutions for Amsco's Algebra 2 and Trigonometry | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9781567657029

Amsco's Algebra 2 and Trigonometry | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781567657029 | Authors: Gantert

Solutions for Chapter 2-3: Multiplying And Dividing Rational Expressions

Solutions for Chapter 2-3
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Textbook: Amsco's Algebra 2 and Trigonometry
Edition: 1
Author: Gantert
ISBN: 9781567657029

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 30 problems in chapter 2-3: Multiplying And Dividing Rational Expressions have been answered, more than 31272 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Amsco's Algebra 2 and Trigonometry, edition: 1. Amsco's Algebra 2 and Trigonometry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781567657029. Chapter 2-3: Multiplying And Dividing Rational Expressions includes 30 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Cofactor Cij.

    Remove row i and column j; multiply the determinant by (-I)i + j •

  • Four Fundamental Subspaces C (A), N (A), C (AT), N (AT).

    Use AT for complex A.

  • Full row rank r = m.

    Independent rows, at least one solution to Ax = b, column space is all of Rm. Full rank means full column rank or full row rank.

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Identity matrix I (or In).

    Diagonal entries = 1, off-diagonal entries = 0.

  • Inverse matrix A-I.

    Square matrix with A-I A = I and AA-l = I. No inverse if det A = 0 and rank(A) < n and Ax = 0 for a nonzero vector x. The inverses of AB and AT are B-1 A-I and (A-I)T. Cofactor formula (A-l)ij = Cji! detA.

  • Kirchhoff's Laws.

    Current Law: net current (in minus out) is zero at each node. Voltage Law: Potential differences (voltage drops) add to zero around any closed loop.

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Left nullspace N (AT).

    Nullspace of AT = "left nullspace" of A because y T A = OT.

  • Linear transformation T.

    Each vector V in the input space transforms to T (v) in the output space, and linearity requires T(cv + dw) = c T(v) + d T(w). Examples: Matrix multiplication A v, differentiation and integration in function space.

  • Markov matrix M.

    All mij > 0 and each column sum is 1. Largest eigenvalue A = 1. If mij > 0, the columns of Mk approach the steady state eigenvector M s = s > O.

  • Matrix multiplication AB.

    The i, j entry of AB is (row i of A)·(column j of B) = L aikbkj. By columns: Column j of AB = A times column j of B. By rows: row i of A multiplies B. Columns times rows: AB = sum of (column k)(row k). All these equivalent definitions come from the rule that A B times x equals A times B x .

  • Pivot columns of A.

    Columns that contain pivots after row reduction. These are not combinations of earlier columns. The pivot columns are a basis for the column space.

  • Pivot.

    The diagonal entry (first nonzero) at the time when a row is used in elimination.

  • Rayleigh quotient q (x) = X T Ax I x T x for symmetric A: Amin < q (x) < Amax.

    Those extremes are reached at the eigenvectors x for Amin(A) and Amax(A).

  • Schwarz inequality

    Iv·wl < IIvll IIwll.Then IvTAwl2 < (vT Av)(wT Aw) for pos def A.

  • Simplex method for linear programming.

    The minimum cost vector x * is found by moving from comer to lower cost comer along the edges of the feasible set (where the constraints Ax = b and x > 0 are satisfied). Minimum cost at a comer!

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.

  • Transpose matrix AT.

    Entries AL = Ajj. AT is n by In, AT A is square, symmetric, positive semidefinite. The transposes of AB and A-I are BT AT and (AT)-I.

  • Unitary matrix UH = U T = U-I.

    Orthonormal columns (complex analog of Q).