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Solutions for Chapter 8: Vectors and Matrix Models

Biocalculus: Calculus for Life Sciences | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781133109631 | Authors: James Stewart, Troy Day

Full solutions for Biocalculus: Calculus for Life Sciences | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9781133109631

Biocalculus: Calculus for Life Sciences | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781133109631 | Authors: James Stewart, Troy Day

Solutions for Chapter 8: Vectors and Matrix Models

Solutions for Chapter 8
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Textbook: Biocalculus: Calculus for Life Sciences
Edition: 1
Author: James Stewart, Troy Day
ISBN: 9781133109631

Biocalculus: Calculus for Life Sciences was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781133109631. Chapter 8: Vectors and Matrix Models includes 39 full step-by-step solutions. Since 39 problems in chapter 8: Vectors and Matrix Models have been answered, more than 26073 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Biocalculus: Calculus for Life Sciences , edition: 1.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Adjacency matrix of a graph.

    Square matrix with aij = 1 when there is an edge from node i to node j; otherwise aij = O. A = AT when edges go both ways (undirected). Adjacency matrix of a graph. Square matrix with aij = 1 when there is an edge from node i to node j; otherwise aij = O. A = AT when edges go both ways (undirected).

  • Basis for V.

    Independent vectors VI, ... , v d whose linear combinations give each vector in V as v = CIVI + ... + CdVd. V has many bases, each basis gives unique c's. A vector space has many bases!

  • Block matrix.

    A matrix can be partitioned into matrix blocks, by cuts between rows and/or between columns. Block multiplication ofAB is allowed if the block shapes permit.

  • Condition number

    cond(A) = c(A) = IIAIlIIA-III = amaxlamin. In Ax = b, the relative change Ilox III Ilx II is less than cond(A) times the relative change Ilob III lib II· Condition numbers measure the sensitivity of the output to change in the input.

  • Free columns of A.

    Columns without pivots; these are combinations of earlier columns.

  • Free variable Xi.

    Column i has no pivot in elimination. We can give the n - r free variables any values, then Ax = b determines the r pivot variables (if solvable!).

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Hermitian matrix A H = AT = A.

    Complex analog a j i = aU of a symmetric matrix.

  • Inverse matrix A-I.

    Square matrix with A-I A = I and AA-l = I. No inverse if det A = 0 and rank(A) < n and Ax = 0 for a nonzero vector x. The inverses of AB and AT are B-1 A-I and (A-I)T. Cofactor formula (A-l)ij = Cji! detA.

  • Least squares solution X.

    The vector x that minimizes the error lie 112 solves AT Ax = ATb. Then e = b - Ax is orthogonal to all columns of A.

  • Orthonormal vectors q 1 , ... , q n·

    Dot products are q T q j = 0 if i =1= j and q T q i = 1. The matrix Q with these orthonormal columns has Q T Q = I. If m = n then Q T = Q -1 and q 1 ' ... , q n is an orthonormal basis for Rn : every v = L (v T q j )q j •

  • Particular solution x p.

    Any solution to Ax = b; often x p has free variables = o.

  • Positive definite matrix A.

    Symmetric matrix with positive eigenvalues and positive pivots. Definition: x T Ax > 0 unless x = O. Then A = LDLT with diag(D» O.

  • Rank one matrix A = uvT f=. O.

    Column and row spaces = lines cu and cv.

  • Similar matrices A and B.

    Every B = M-I AM has the same eigenvalues as A.

  • Simplex method for linear programming.

    The minimum cost vector x * is found by moving from comer to lower cost comer along the edges of the feasible set (where the constraints Ax = b and x > 0 are satisfied). Minimum cost at a comer!

  • Skew-symmetric matrix K.

    The transpose is -K, since Kij = -Kji. Eigenvalues are pure imaginary, eigenvectors are orthogonal, eKt is an orthogonal matrix.

  • Spanning set.

    Combinations of VI, ... ,Vm fill the space. The columns of A span C (A)!

  • Stiffness matrix

    If x gives the movements of the nodes, K x gives the internal forces. K = ATe A where C has spring constants from Hooke's Law and Ax = stretching.

  • Vandermonde matrix V.

    V c = b gives coefficients of p(x) = Co + ... + Cn_IXn- 1 with P(Xi) = bi. Vij = (Xi)j-I and det V = product of (Xk - Xi) for k > i.

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