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Solutions for Chapter 5.6: The Quadratic Formula and the Discriminant

California Algebra 2: Concepts, Skills, and Problem Solving | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780078778568 | Authors: Berchie Holliday

Full solutions for California Algebra 2: Concepts, Skills, and Problem Solving | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780078778568

California Algebra 2: Concepts, Skills, and Problem Solving | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780078778568 | Authors: Berchie Holliday

Solutions for Chapter 5.6: The Quadratic Formula and the Discriminant

Solutions for Chapter 5.6
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Textbook: California Algebra 2: Concepts, Skills, and Problem Solving
Edition: 1
Author: Berchie Holliday
ISBN: 9780078778568

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: California Algebra 2: Concepts, Skills, and Problem Solving, edition: 1. Since 72 problems in chapter 5.6: The Quadratic Formula and the Discriminant have been answered, more than 44240 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 5.6: The Quadratic Formula and the Discriminant includes 72 full step-by-step solutions. California Algebra 2: Concepts, Skills, and Problem Solving was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780078778568. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Adjacency matrix of a graph.

    Square matrix with aij = 1 when there is an edge from node i to node j; otherwise aij = O. A = AT when edges go both ways (undirected). Adjacency matrix of a graph. Square matrix with aij = 1 when there is an edge from node i to node j; otherwise aij = O. A = AT when edges go both ways (undirected).

  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Column space C (A) =

    space of all combinations of the columns of A.

  • Commuting matrices AB = BA.

    If diagonalizable, they share n eigenvectors.

  • Companion matrix.

    Put CI, ... ,Cn in row n and put n - 1 ones just above the main diagonal. Then det(A - AI) = ±(CI + c2A + C3A 2 + .•. + cnA n-l - An).

  • Diagonalizable matrix A.

    Must have n independent eigenvectors (in the columns of S; automatic with n different eigenvalues). Then S-I AS = A = eigenvalue matrix.

  • Eigenvalue A and eigenvector x.

    Ax = AX with x#-O so det(A - AI) = o.

  • Elimination matrix = Elementary matrix Eij.

    The identity matrix with an extra -eij in the i, j entry (i #- j). Then Eij A subtracts eij times row j of A from row i.

  • Elimination.

    A sequence of row operations that reduces A to an upper triangular U or to the reduced form R = rref(A). Then A = LU with multipliers eO in L, or P A = L U with row exchanges in P, or E A = R with an invertible E.

  • Fundamental Theorem.

    The nullspace N (A) and row space C (AT) are orthogonal complements in Rn(perpendicular from Ax = 0 with dimensions rand n - r). Applied to AT, the column space C(A) is the orthogonal complement of N(AT) in Rm.

  • Hilbert matrix hilb(n).

    Entries HU = 1/(i + j -1) = Jd X i- 1 xj-1dx. Positive definite but extremely small Amin and large condition number: H is ill-conditioned.

  • Iterative method.

    A sequence of steps intended to approach the desired solution.

  • Linear combination cv + d w or L C jV j.

    Vector addition and scalar multiplication.

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Outer product uv T

    = column times row = rank one matrix.

  • Positive definite matrix A.

    Symmetric matrix with positive eigenvalues and positive pivots. Definition: x T Ax > 0 unless x = O. Then A = LDLT with diag(D» O.

  • Pseudoinverse A+ (Moore-Penrose inverse).

    The n by m matrix that "inverts" A from column space back to row space, with N(A+) = N(AT). A+ A and AA+ are the projection matrices onto the row space and column space. Rank(A +) = rank(A).

  • Simplex method for linear programming.

    The minimum cost vector x * is found by moving from comer to lower cost comer along the edges of the feasible set (where the constraints Ax = b and x > 0 are satisfied). Minimum cost at a comer!

  • Singular Value Decomposition

    (SVD) A = U:E VT = (orthogonal) ( diag)( orthogonal) First r columns of U and V are orthonormal bases of C (A) and C (AT), AVi = O'iUi with singular value O'i > O. Last columns are orthonormal bases of nullspaces.

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.

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