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Solutions for Chapter 10.6: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications 7th Edition

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen

Full solutions for Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780073383095

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen

Solutions for Chapter 10.6

Solutions for Chapter 10.6
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Textbook: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications
Edition: 7
Author: Kenneth Rosen
ISBN: 9780073383095

Since 31 problems in chapter 10.6 have been answered, more than 185399 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073383095. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, edition: 7. Chapter 10.6 includes 31 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Change of basis matrix M.

    The old basis vectors v j are combinations L mij Wi of the new basis vectors. The coordinates of CI VI + ... + cnvn = dl wI + ... + dn Wn are related by d = M c. (For n = 2 set VI = mll WI +m21 W2, V2 = m12WI +m22w2.)

  • Complex conjugate

    z = a - ib for any complex number z = a + ib. Then zz = Iz12.

  • Ellipse (or ellipsoid) x T Ax = 1.

    A must be positive definite; the axes of the ellipse are eigenvectors of A, with lengths 1/.JI. (For IIx II = 1 the vectors y = Ax lie on the ellipse IIA-1 yll2 = Y T(AAT)-1 Y = 1 displayed by eigshow; axis lengths ad

  • Fourier matrix F.

    Entries Fjk = e21Cijk/n give orthogonal columns FT F = nI. Then y = Fe is the (inverse) Discrete Fourier Transform Y j = L cke21Cijk/n.

  • Free variable Xi.

    Column i has no pivot in elimination. We can give the n - r free variables any values, then Ax = b determines the r pivot variables (if solvable!).

  • Full column rank r = n.

    Independent columns, N(A) = {O}, no free variables.

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Graph G.

    Set of n nodes connected pairwise by m edges. A complete graph has all n(n - 1)/2 edges between nodes. A tree has only n - 1 edges and no closed loops.

  • Linear transformation T.

    Each vector V in the input space transforms to T (v) in the output space, and linearity requires T(cv + dw) = c T(v) + d T(w). Examples: Matrix multiplication A v, differentiation and integration in function space.

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Normal equation AT Ax = ATb.

    Gives the least squares solution to Ax = b if A has full rank n (independent columns). The equation says that (columns of A)·(b - Ax) = o.

  • Nullspace N (A)

    = All solutions to Ax = O. Dimension n - r = (# columns) - rank.

  • Polar decomposition A = Q H.

    Orthogonal Q times positive (semi)definite H.

  • Pseudoinverse A+ (Moore-Penrose inverse).

    The n by m matrix that "inverts" A from column space back to row space, with N(A+) = N(AT). A+ A and AA+ are the projection matrices onto the row space and column space. Rank(A +) = rank(A).

  • Rank one matrix A = uvT f=. O.

    Column and row spaces = lines cu and cv.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Rayleigh quotient q (x) = X T Ax I x T x for symmetric A: Amin < q (x) < Amax.

    Those extremes are reached at the eigenvectors x for Amin(A) and Amax(A).

  • Rotation matrix

    R = [~ CS ] rotates the plane by () and R- 1 = RT rotates back by -(). Eigenvalues are eiO and e-iO , eigenvectors are (1, ±i). c, s = cos (), sin ().

  • Saddle point of I(x}, ... ,xn ).

    A point where the first derivatives of I are zero and the second derivative matrix (a2 II aXi ax j = Hessian matrix) is indefinite.

  • Similar matrices A and B.

    Every B = M-I AM has the same eigenvalues as A.

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