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Solutions for Chapter 1.R: Propositional Equivalences

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen

Full solutions for Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780073383095

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen

Solutions for Chapter 1.R: Propositional Equivalences

Summary of Chapter 1.R: Propositional Equivalences

An important type of step used in a mathematical argument is the replacement of a statement with another statement with the same truth value.

Chapter 1.R: Propositional Equivalences includes 16 full step-by-step solutions. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073383095. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 16 problems in chapter 1.R: Propositional Equivalences have been answered, more than 851317 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, edition: 7.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Column picture of Ax = b.

    The vector b becomes a combination of the columns of A. The system is solvable only when b is in the column space C (A).

  • Cramer's Rule for Ax = b.

    B j has b replacing column j of A; x j = det B j I det A

  • Diagonal matrix D.

    dij = 0 if i #- j. Block-diagonal: zero outside square blocks Du.

  • Dimension of vector space

    dim(V) = number of vectors in any basis for V.

  • Factorization

    A = L U. If elimination takes A to U without row exchanges, then the lower triangular L with multipliers eij (and eii = 1) brings U back to A.

  • Free columns of A.

    Columns without pivots; these are combinations of earlier columns.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Least squares solution X.

    The vector x that minimizes the error lie 112 solves AT Ax = ATb. Then e = b - Ax is orthogonal to all columns of A.

  • Matrix multiplication AB.

    The i, j entry of AB is (row i of A)·(column j of B) = L aikbkj. By columns: Column j of AB = A times column j of B. By rows: row i of A multiplies B. Columns times rows: AB = sum of (column k)(row k). All these equivalent definitions come from the rule that A B times x equals A times B x .

  • Minimal polynomial of A.

    The lowest degree polynomial with meA) = zero matrix. This is peA) = det(A - AI) if no eigenvalues are repeated; always meA) divides peA).

  • Multiplicities AM and G M.

    The algebraic multiplicity A M of A is the number of times A appears as a root of det(A - AI) = O. The geometric multiplicity GM is the number of independent eigenvectors for A (= dimension of the eigenspace).

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Orthonormal vectors q 1 , ... , q n·

    Dot products are q T q j = 0 if i =1= j and q T q i = 1. The matrix Q with these orthonormal columns has Q T Q = I. If m = n then Q T = Q -1 and q 1 ' ... , q n is an orthonormal basis for Rn : every v = L (v T q j )q j •

  • Pivot columns of A.

    Columns that contain pivots after row reduction. These are not combinations of earlier columns. The pivot columns are a basis for the column space.

  • Projection matrix P onto subspace S.

    Projection p = P b is the closest point to b in S, error e = b - Pb is perpendicularto S. p 2 = P = pT, eigenvalues are 1 or 0, eigenvectors are in S or S...L. If columns of A = basis for S then P = A (AT A) -1 AT.

  • Rayleigh quotient q (x) = X T Ax I x T x for symmetric A: Amin < q (x) < Amax.

    Those extremes are reached at the eigenvectors x for Amin(A) and Amax(A).

  • Reduced row echelon form R = rref(A).

    Pivots = 1; zeros above and below pivots; the r nonzero rows of R give a basis for the row space of A.

  • Reflection matrix (Householder) Q = I -2uuT.

    Unit vector u is reflected to Qu = -u. All x intheplanemirroruTx = o have Qx = x. Notice QT = Q-1 = Q.

  • Right inverse A+.

    If A has full row rank m, then A+ = AT(AAT)-l has AA+ = 1m.

  • Skew-symmetric matrix K.

    The transpose is -K, since Kij = -Kji. Eigenvalues are pure imaginary, eigenvectors are orthogonal, eKt is an orthogonal matrix.