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Solutions for Chapter 2.6: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications 7th Edition

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen

Full solutions for Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780073383095

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen

Solutions for Chapter 2.6

Solutions for Chapter 2.6
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Textbook: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications
Edition: 7
Author: Kenneth Rosen
ISBN: 9780073383095

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073383095. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, edition: 7. Chapter 2.6 includes 35 full step-by-step solutions. Since 35 problems in chapter 2.6 have been answered, more than 437793 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Augmented matrix [A b].

    Ax = b is solvable when b is in the column space of A; then [A b] has the same rank as A. Elimination on [A b] keeps equations correct.

  • Column picture of Ax = b.

    The vector b becomes a combination of the columns of A. The system is solvable only when b is in the column space C (A).

  • Conjugate Gradient Method.

    A sequence of steps (end of Chapter 9) to solve positive definite Ax = b by minimizing !x T Ax - x Tb over growing Krylov subspaces.

  • Cyclic shift

    S. Permutation with S21 = 1, S32 = 1, ... , finally SIn = 1. Its eigenvalues are the nth roots e2lrik/n of 1; eigenvectors are columns of the Fourier matrix F.

  • Dimension of vector space

    dim(V) = number of vectors in any basis for V.

  • Distributive Law

    A(B + C) = AB + AC. Add then multiply, or mUltiply then add.

  • Elimination matrix = Elementary matrix Eij.

    The identity matrix with an extra -eij in the i, j entry (i #- j). Then Eij A subtracts eij times row j of A from row i.

  • Incidence matrix of a directed graph.

    The m by n edge-node incidence matrix has a row for each edge (node i to node j), with entries -1 and 1 in columns i and j .

  • Independent vectors VI, .. " vk.

    No combination cl VI + ... + qVk = zero vector unless all ci = O. If the v's are the columns of A, the only solution to Ax = 0 is x = o.

  • Inverse matrix A-I.

    Square matrix with A-I A = I and AA-l = I. No inverse if det A = 0 and rank(A) < n and Ax = 0 for a nonzero vector x. The inverses of AB and AT are B-1 A-I and (A-I)T. Cofactor formula (A-l)ij = Cji! detA.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Least squares solution X.

    The vector x that minimizes the error lie 112 solves AT Ax = ATb. Then e = b - Ax is orthogonal to all columns of A.

  • Multiplier eij.

    The pivot row j is multiplied by eij and subtracted from row i to eliminate the i, j entry: eij = (entry to eliminate) / (jth pivot).

  • Normal matrix.

    If N NT = NT N, then N has orthonormal (complex) eigenvectors.

  • Partial pivoting.

    In each column, choose the largest available pivot to control roundoff; all multipliers have leij I < 1. See condition number.

  • Pascal matrix

    Ps = pascal(n) = the symmetric matrix with binomial entries (i1~;2). Ps = PL Pu all contain Pascal's triangle with det = 1 (see Pascal in the index).

  • Random matrix rand(n) or randn(n).

    MATLAB creates a matrix with random entries, uniformly distributed on [0 1] for rand and standard normal distribution for randn.

  • Rotation matrix

    R = [~ CS ] rotates the plane by () and R- 1 = RT rotates back by -(). Eigenvalues are eiO and e-iO , eigenvectors are (1, ±i). c, s = cos (), sin ().

  • Simplex method for linear programming.

    The minimum cost vector x * is found by moving from comer to lower cost comer along the edges of the feasible set (where the constraints Ax = b and x > 0 are satisfied). Minimum cost at a comer!

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.