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Solutions for Chapter 3.7: Mechanical and Electrical Vibrations

Full solutions for Elementary Differential Equations | 10th Edition

ISBN: 9780470458327

Solutions for Chapter 3.7: Mechanical and Electrical Vibrations

Solutions for Chapter 3.7
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Textbook: Elementary Differential Equations
Edition: 10
Author: William E. Boyce, Richard C. DiPrima
ISBN: 9780470458327

Chapter 3.7: Mechanical and Electrical Vibrations includes 32 full step-by-step solutions. Since 32 problems in chapter 3.7: Mechanical and Electrical Vibrations have been answered, more than 11399 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Differential Equations, edition: 10. Elementary Differential Equations was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470458327. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Associative Law (AB)C = A(BC).

    Parentheses can be removed to leave ABC.

  • Block matrix.

    A matrix can be partitioned into matrix blocks, by cuts between rows and/or between columns. Block multiplication ofAB is allowed if the block shapes permit.

  • Characteristic equation det(A - AI) = O.

    The n roots are the eigenvalues of A.

  • Circulant matrix C.

    Constant diagonals wrap around as in cyclic shift S. Every circulant is Col + CIS + ... + Cn_lSn - l . Cx = convolution c * x. Eigenvectors in F.

  • Cross product u xv in R3:

    Vector perpendicular to u and v, length Ilullllvlll sin el = area of parallelogram, u x v = "determinant" of [i j k; UI U2 U3; VI V2 V3].

  • Determinant IAI = det(A).

    Defined by det I = 1, sign reversal for row exchange, and linearity in each row. Then IAI = 0 when A is singular. Also IABI = IAIIBI and

  • Diagonalizable matrix A.

    Must have n independent eigenvectors (in the columns of S; automatic with n different eigenvalues). Then S-I AS = A = eigenvalue matrix.

  • Distributive Law

    A(B + C) = AB + AC. Add then multiply, or mUltiply then add.

  • Free columns of A.

    Columns without pivots; these are combinations of earlier columns.

  • Hypercube matrix pl.

    Row n + 1 counts corners, edges, faces, ... of a cube in Rn.

  • Indefinite matrix.

    A symmetric matrix with eigenvalues of both signs (+ and - ).

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Orthogonal subspaces.

    Every v in V is orthogonal to every w in W.

  • Rayleigh quotient q (x) = X T Ax I x T x for symmetric A: Amin < q (x) < Amax.

    Those extremes are reached at the eigenvectors x for Amin(A) and Amax(A).

  • Row picture of Ax = b.

    Each equation gives a plane in Rn; the planes intersect at x.

  • Schwarz inequality

    Iv·wl < IIvll IIwll.Then IvTAwl2 < (vT Av)(wT Aw) for pos def A.

  • Similar matrices A and B.

    Every B = M-I AM has the same eigenvalues as A.

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.

  • Symmetric matrix A.

    The transpose is AT = A, and aU = a ji. A-I is also symmetric.

  • Trace of A

    = sum of diagonal entries = sum of eigenvalues of A. Tr AB = Tr BA.

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