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Solutions for Chapter 4.9: Coordinates and Isomorphisms

Full solutions for Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780471669593

Solutions for Chapter 4.9: Coordinates and Isomorphisms

Solutions for Chapter 4.9
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Textbook: Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications
Edition: 9
Author: Howard Anton, Chris Rorres
ISBN: 9780471669593

Since 51 problems in chapter 4.9: Coordinates and Isomorphisms have been answered, more than 10247 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 4.9: Coordinates and Isomorphisms includes 51 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications, edition: 9. Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780471669593.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Associative Law (AB)C = A(BC).

    Parentheses can be removed to leave ABC.

  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Cofactor Cij.

    Remove row i and column j; multiply the determinant by (-I)i + j •

  • Commuting matrices AB = BA.

    If diagonalizable, they share n eigenvectors.

  • Covariance matrix:E.

    When random variables Xi have mean = average value = 0, their covariances "'£ ij are the averages of XiX j. With means Xi, the matrix :E = mean of (x - x) (x - x) T is positive (semi)definite; :E is diagonal if the Xi are independent.

  • Cramer's Rule for Ax = b.

    B j has b replacing column j of A; x j = det B j I det A

  • Echelon matrix U.

    The first nonzero entry (the pivot) in each row comes in a later column than the pivot in the previous row. All zero rows come last.

  • Exponential eAt = I + At + (At)2 12! + ...

    has derivative AeAt; eAt u(O) solves u' = Au.

  • Hilbert matrix hilb(n).

    Entries HU = 1/(i + j -1) = Jd X i- 1 xj-1dx. Positive definite but extremely small Amin and large condition number: H is ill-conditioned.

  • Krylov subspace Kj(A, b).

    The subspace spanned by b, Ab, ... , Aj-Ib. Numerical methods approximate A -I b by x j with residual b - Ax j in this subspace. A good basis for K j requires only multiplication by A at each step.

  • Linear transformation T.

    Each vector V in the input space transforms to T (v) in the output space, and linearity requires T(cv + dw) = c T(v) + d T(w). Examples: Matrix multiplication A v, differentiation and integration in function space.

  • Norm

    IIA II. The ".e 2 norm" of A is the maximum ratio II Ax II/l1x II = O"max· Then II Ax II < IIAllllxll and IIABII < IIAIIIIBII and IIA + BII < IIAII + IIBII. Frobenius norm IIAII} = L La~. The.e 1 and.e oo norms are largest column and row sums of laij I.

  • Normal matrix.

    If N NT = NT N, then N has orthonormal (complex) eigenvectors.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Row space C (AT) = all combinations of rows of A.

    Column vectors by convention.

  • Simplex method for linear programming.

    The minimum cost vector x * is found by moving from comer to lower cost comer along the edges of the feasible set (where the constraints Ax = b and x > 0 are satisfied). Minimum cost at a comer!

  • Unitary matrix UH = U T = U-I.

    Orthonormal columns (complex analog of Q).

  • Vector v in Rn.

    Sequence of n real numbers v = (VI, ... , Vn) = point in Rn.

  • Volume of box.

    The rows (or the columns) of A generate a box with volume I det(A) I.

  • Wavelets Wjk(t).

    Stretch and shift the time axis to create Wjk(t) = woo(2j t - k).